Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/02/2021 in all areas

  1. 12 points
  2. I did this. Got a bit fed up with all the blue.
    11 points
  3. Well it's been 12 months and I am still delighted with my choice. The 1290 is a brilliant bike and is just right for what I want from a bike at the moment. Much like the Tracer the engine is absolutely intoxicating although in a different way. This is my first twin and I must say I'm impressed. The torque and power seem simply endless. Since I posted the picture at the start of this thread I have made some minor additions/changes. I have fitted a black Arrow silencer; the looks and sound are so much better than the original. I've also fitted KTM original crash bars, an Outback Motortek bashplate and a Givi adapter plate for my topbox. The only other change currently on my to-do list is the screen which, like the Tracer's, is crap generating a lot of noise and turbulence. I find the suspension excellent and it is great being able to change settings on the fly. In fact the whole dashboard is really good with lots of info and easy to navigate. I have the bike paired to my phone and Cardo headset. Calls are displayed on the dashboard and can be controlled from the left hand grip. It also displays turn by turn navigation from my phone on the dash. The standard seat is fine for me although, much like this forum, the KTM forums I now frequent are littered with posts complaining about how uncomfortable the standard seat is. KTM do a comfort seat (with or without heating) which is supposed to be excellent. Fuel range is great, depending on riding style and I have seen just short of 400km before needing to fill up. Should be a great touring bike. No complaints or niggles so far. The only thing I don't like compared to the Tracer is the extra weight when moving it around the driveway. It's not that much heavier than the Tracer, but the extra weight is noticeable. CS
    10 points
  4. According to the owner manual, Yamaha states the temp gauge will not go beyond 115F if I recall correctly. Well guys, I hit 122 when filling up on gas and that’s with the engine heat affecting the temperature sensor. However I also hit 120F WHILE riding 65 MPH. That’s a more accurate reading the ambient temperature. Not sure why there’s a line on the dash, my iPhone was acting up while taking the picture and overheating sometimes. According to my dash the average temperature in Death Valley was around 117F when my brother and I went through. BTW, it’s amazing view riding through Death Valley! Would definitely recommend it. Just pick a right time when it’s not too hot!
    9 points
  5. Greetings from North Carolina. I had a deer run me off the road into a ditch on my 2018 FJR in April. The bike was totaled and I injured my knee. I loved that bike. It did everything I asked it to and put a smile on my face everytime I twisted that throttle. Once my knee healed up I started looking for a new one but no one had one on the floor. One salesman suggested I come in and check out the new Tracer GT they had just assembled. I had thought about going lighter but did not want to give up the engine performance and features of the big boy. He went over the features and said he thought I might be impressed with the performance so I took ride up there. I didn't realize how much of a difference 155lbs can make until I took it for a test ride. I am 62 years young with a 30" inseam so balancing and moving that top heavy FJR could be a challenge for me until she got rolling. The Tracer feels like a dirt bike by comparison. Once I got rolling I opened up the throttle bodies a little and that smile came back to me. I took it home 2 days later. I did the 600 mile service myself and put 400 more gentle miles on her for the engine break in. Since then I have logged a few hundred more not so gentle miles enjoying the growl of that CP3 every chance I get to crack the throttle. Looking forward to learning a lot from you guys so thanks in advance!
    9 points
  6. I've had my 2018 900 GT since the end of June, and have done about 400-500 miles (2065 miles when i got it, second owner). All to and from work along English country roads (lots of nice twisty bits!). Really enjoying the bike so far! Got the bike pretty standard with dealer extras: Akrapovic full system Right side engine cover Engine lower crash protection (removed to fit Givi bars) LED indicators/running lights Radiator guard Added over the last couple weeks: R&G front spindle sliders R&G rear spindle sliders & adjusters R&G Passenger footrest blanking plates R&G bar ends R&G tank grips R&G side stand foot Highsider mirrors Puig beak Givi crash bars Givi passenger seat luggage mount Michelin Road 5 tyres Pyramid fender extenders front and rear Datatool alarm upgrade To-do: Make Givi sump guard work with non-standard exhaust (front right bracket need bending) Fit headlight protectors Fit screen (Puig shorty) Replace disc and sprocket nuts/bolts with stainless and titanium Fit rear sliders Fit MT09 over-wheel guard Fit EvoTech levers Fit small tail tidy to blank off stock, and mount rear indicators and reflector Fit R&G tail tidy to over-wheel mount Replace a whole lot of fixing with stainless Good things: Suspension - Great out-of-the-box - But will be getting it professionally set up for me and my usage. Throttle response - Never been a fan of fly-by-wire, but was pleasantly surprised Build quality Do i even need to mention the engine? Leg room - Foot position felt very odd initially, but happy with it now. Fuel economy - I'm still struggling to believe it. Bad things: Fuel gauge - Full, full, full, half...no quarter, no! fill me now! Stock screen Seat angle - Just need to do the slope mod Mode button - I would much rather have the pass light there. Standard tyres - The D222s are utter trash Low-quality chain/sprocket/ring - Already weathered badly. Stock mirrors - Cheap crap
    7 points
  7. I just traded in my Red 2015 FJ09 for a slightly used 2020 Tracer GT 900 (611 miles). So far I'm very pleased, it seems everything is a little bit better. I know some people still don't like the suspension but it's defiantly a smoother ride then on my 2015. The cruise control is wonderful to have. After a half hour ride with the cruise and maybe a different bend on the bars I felt great. On my old bike my right hand would go numb. I think the new windscreen is better then the old one some, I'm sure there is a aftermarket that's better but I'm satisfied after 5 years with the stock old one. The engine seems smoother even though I had a flash on the old one. The only thing I don't like better with the new bikes motor is the engine braking. It must have been turned off on the old one with the flash. The quick shifter took some getting used to. I finally figured out it's smoother from 2nd up and have been using it accordingly. So far the only frustrations I've had was when I was trying to reset the trip meters. The previous owner lost the manual in the 6 months he owned it. I downloaded the manual from Yamaha's website and all is well. Also the stock side panniers are smaller then I'm used to, I had some Shad's that were bigger on my old bike, but I didn't have a top case so it evens out. So far I'm a happy man. I only wish I didn't have to work so I could go riding more. Oh yeah one last thing. The previous owner left the warning sticker on the tank. It took the better part of an hour to get the glue off after removing it. It might have been made worse by the flat Black paint that I'm not to crazy about. But I looks fine now.
    7 points
  8. Yesterday, it's 8:30am. My plans for the day had fallen through, so I popped on to Facebook to see if the local riding groups where doing anything, and found an off-hand comment for a group ride leaving at 10am near me. They're planning a Calgary -> Canmore via 1A -> Hwy40 -> Longview -> Back to Calgary loop. 418kms, and a really great set of roads. Hell, I'm in! No time for questions, so I hop on the bike and go. Except... It's a big group ride. Not big-to-me (which is >5 people) but big. 60 bikes big, a charity event for "Fresh Start". Well, I'm there, and it's for a good charity, and I've never actually been on a big ride before, so... Eh, I'm in. Not gonna lie, this was worrying. Also, pretty concerning, given it was almost entirely Harley's - my Tracer, a V-Strom, an R3 and a Striple where the *only* bikes that weren't cruisers. Of 60 some bikes. We get going, and it's a nightmare. About a kilometer long stretch of bikes riding through and around cities simply has to be chaotic. Most stressed I've ever been on a bike, with the constant fear of any one of the dozens of bikes ahead of me (and all the normal traffic) doing something stupid and causing a horrific multiple vehicle crash. Then you're getting onto wonderful winding mountain roads... with so very many other bikes all of varying skill levels and a near complete lack of cornering ability. Made it to the second stop - Ghost Lake Reservoir, near the start of Hwy 1A, just before it gets all twisty, and I couldn't do it anymore. Decided to finish the ride by following in front. As soon as people started heading towards their bikes at a stop, I'd tear off to the next stop. Much, much better - and I'm deeply thankful I didn't have to ride down my favourite local twisties at depressingly low speeds dodging wallowing cruisers. Ended up being a reasonably fun day, and it did benefit a good cause, but damn, I will never, ever do that again. Huge group rides are definitely *not* my thing.
    7 points
  9. As colorful and 'updated' as the new displays are, I still enjoy the very legible and simple (old school) display of the original FJ09.
    7 points
  10. Finally picked mine up 2 days ago! It's soooo freaking awesome! 🔥🤘 this is completely a different bike compared to the Tracer 900. And the new gauges are really easy to read and looks great on this bike.
    7 points
  11. Yeah, no torque wrench, just 3/8ths drive socket, tight till firm then 2 degrees more, that's it. Hard to explain "feel" been doing it 40 years.
    7 points
  12. So yup, Yamaha did their yearly demo at the one big dealers near me and they actually had a Tracer 9 GT. For reference, I currently ride a 2016 Fj-09 with 23K miles on it; Sargent seat (and some minor cosmetic things), but otherwise stock. I can not believe how much improved the Tracer 9 GT is. The ride was very noticeably smoother, I now understand why people think the previous gen's suspension is bad. There's still some on/off throttle jerkiness, but the surging/unevenness when at very low input (parking lot maneuvering speeds) is pretty much gone. I 've seen some people say the Tracer 9 seemed taller in the seat than the previous generation, for me this wasn't the case. I'm 5'9" and 29" inseam, and I still can't flat foot it, but I could get more of my feet down vs my FJ-09. Ergonomically, the foot pegs seem just a smidge further forward and that makes the seating position feel a lot more neutral. I definitely preferred it to the FJ-09. Windscreen is so easy to adjust and in the high position it kept me (again 5'9") almost entirely out of the wind. I already thought the Fj-09 had one of the best stock exhaust notes, but it's even better on the Tracer 9. As is always the case, these test rides are pretty short. It was an 8 mile/20 minute ride. Nowhere near long enough to make a judgement on the seat and really had no opportunity to mess with cruise control and other electronics. There only downside that I found: the dash truly sucks. The screens are too small and I already knew from reviews the angle was bad, but man, even with me being shorter, it still felt like they're pointing at my chest, not my face. This is not a deal breaker for me, I don't spend much ride time looking at the dash, but I really don't understand what Yamaha was thinking here. Must have gotten a good deal on on tiny TFT screens that no one wanted. Anyway, now I'm quite depressed. I was already sold on the Tracer 9 GT and I have been trying to get one since April, but no dealer in 150 miles that I called/emailed has them and none could provide an estimate for when they would get them. Now I know just how good the bike I'm missing out on is
    6 points
  13. While on a recent road trip with a buddy who also owns a 2015 FJ, we swapped bikes and I immediately noticed how light the throttle turn is on his bike. My throttle tube turns smoothly, snaps back like it should and doesn't stick even at full left or right steering lock, it just takes a fair amount of effort to turn, I had just accepted that as normal for this bike (first bike where throttle cable actuates a servo motor). Since there was so much of a difference between the 2 bikes, I decided to investigate. The bikes are identical (as far as motor and fueling, with 2WDW flash) the only difference is mine has the factory heated grips. I took the throttle housing apart and disconnected the cables and checked that the tube rotated freely in the housing. Next step was verifying the cable routing was unobstructed and the outer sheath wasn't pinched, kinked or damaged. I tore the bike down to the throttle bodies, traced the cables all the way to the servo pulley and everything looked good. So short of removing the throttle bodies so I could access the cable pulley and spring (complete PITA) I decided to try some Dri Slide cable lube, popular with mountain bikers for lubing control cables. I filled the cables and worked them back and forth until the lube was flowing out the bottom end and ... WHAT A REVELATION, the throttle rotation was immediately and drastically improved, enough that I could turn the throttle with just my thumb and forefinger where previously it took MUCH more effort. I put the bike back together and went out for a ride and WHOA, A-mode is super psychotic with a light throttle turn, now I understand when others mention A-mode possibly being too jumpy in the twisties - I definitely need to retrain my right wrist, its like riding a different bike now.
    6 points
  14. I got in a couple hundred miles along the Texas Gulf Coast near Sargent Beach, and got home just before the heat became unbearable. My ride partner canceled at the last minute this morning, so it was solo freestyle exploring… Gas at the almost world famous Buc-ee’s. You can’t go wrong with the beaver!
    6 points
  15. Incase someone is interested, I got the motorcycle back since today. They told me there was a calibration issue with the throttle. The value was off and the sensor picks it up and locks the throttle as a result. That was also the fault code it had. Now everything seems good (so far) but they assured me it would never happen again.
    6 points
  16. I spent three of the last four weeks in south Florida for work, where the biggest elevation change I experienced was riding an elevator to the fourth floor. And it rained, ALL THE DAMNED TIME. I never even took my sunglasses out of their case last week. No offense meant to Floridians, but your "Sunshine State" moniker is questionable. 😁 Now that I'm back home in Oregon, I felt the need to get out and experience some actual sunshine and get up above sea level. I did a quick little 200 mile Sunday morning loop out to some local high points. My first stop was Mary's Peak: At 4098 feet above sea level, Mary's Peak is the highest point in the Oregon coast range. Someone was kind enough to install a deliciously twisty ribbon of asphalt nearly to the top. Corvallis and Albany are in the background, down at around 200' ASL. On a clear day you can see across the Willamette Valley to the Cascade mountains in the east. Mt. Jefferson (10,495') is 87 miles away and just barely visible: Looking west from the same parking lot, the Pacific Ocean is just barely visible about 30 miles away. From Mary's Peak I followed OR-34 out to the coast, and then went south on US-101 to Cape Perpetua. Here I rode up to the cape overlook, one of the highest viewpoints on the Oregon coast at 800' ASL. From Cape Perpetua I decided to loop back up to Newport and then come inland on US-20. That was a bit of a mistake as traffic was heavy in Newport and on US-20. By the time I arrived home in Albany I needed to relieve some stress with something green and leafy: My garden. Lily didn't want a pickle. She'd rather ride a motorsickle.
    6 points
  17. I'm with you on that, a group of 4-5 is fine but large group rides simply aren't fun, under any circumstances, period. I got talked into organizing and leading a group ride for about 10 riders in the past and it was a nightmare. Over half of them were strangers to me and everyone had different riding skills and habits as well as bikes with various mechanical condition. One guys bike didn't make it out of the parking lot where we met. Some riders would just pull off the back of the pack for a smoke break and not tell anyone, so I ended up backtracking to find them, others interpreted taking a break to mean its time to buy a 6-pack. We hadn't even ridden 70 miles and a few riders had already deemed it too far and turned around and went home. It was such a waste of my time, I cut the route short and we rode back, only 4 riders left and we covered as much ground in 1 hour as the full group covered in 3 hours. Never again, I either ride solo or in a very small group of like minded friends of similar riding ability.
    6 points
  18. Me either. As the years have moved along, I’ve become more & more of a lone eagle. I will occasionally ride with one or two very carefully vetted friends, but I just can’t deal with the stress of a large group event.
    6 points
  19. Just received my seat back from Laam. First impressions are great. Going to put it to the real long distance test in a couple of weeks.
    6 points
  20. 600mi update! Did some more riding this week to get to the 600mi mark on the T9GT, you can find the one of the longer routes at the below link, I just went there and back fully loaded with gear just as a test: https://bit.ly/3qJgTkC Below are more impressions on the bike, expanding on what I stated previously and some new discoveries: Brakes: They’ve finally settled in, braking power is pretty similar to the old FJ09; maybe marginally better with the radial master cylinder. Seat: Again, would like to reiterate how good it is. I’m 5”10 170lbs-ish and it’s never uncomfortable; it is W I D E. The under-seat storage is hilariously large: it holds my side stand puck, and both pant and jacket rain liners and still has a little bit of room to spare. My jacket liner has a finish to it for comfort, you could probably fit two un-finished rain liners in it for a pillion. Windscreen: I added a $23 eBay spoiler to it. It helps the buffeting at the tallest setting, but I think most of the turbulence does not come from the height, but rather the profile & shape of the stock windscreen. The hourglass taper lets wind wrap around the screen and hit you, which creates noise as it finds its way under the helmet. Also, as confirmed in another thread it uses the same mounting points as the previous 2018-2020 Tracer 900 models. Exhaust: As a mentioned previously in a separate comment this is probably my favorite part of the bike. The entire assembly being under the bike keeps a tidy look, I also personally adore the sound: it has a great mid-bass purr at idle but absolutely roars when you get on it. It hums nicely when cruising. Yamaha earning that tuning fork logo with flying colors on this one. I don’t think I’ll be getting an aftermarket system. Electronics: Since my initial impressions I’ve done almost all of my riding in the “least intrusive” settings: TCS1, Drive mode 1, Suspension 1. Yamaha lists suspension as Sus-1 being for smooth roads and Sus-2 being for bad roads. I don’t think that’s quite an accurate way to describe them. I would consider Sus-1 for twisty riding and Sus-2 for straight riding for the following reasons: sus-2 is wonderfully smooth but will pogo in the hard corners, but it’s also fantastic on straight smooth roads at damping out bumps and sewer lids; but because it will pogo when you push it too hard sus-1 should be used for all aggressive riding regardless of road condition, you’ll need its stiffness to feel the front wheel and you can just deal with the harshness. Sus-1 is very stiff though, I would only use it when you are taking a twisty joy ride or on the track. TCS1 has less of the “leans itself over” feel than TCS2, definitely lets you ride the bike more than it “riding itself”. Anecdotally I think I’m faster in TCS2, it pains me to say that but the computer “helping” in the corners definitely works. Drive mode 1 is much smoother than the old A mode on the FJ-09, no more dirt bike “on-off” feel. I will probably use this for 90% of my riding. BCS2 (cornering ABS) is nice to have? I couldn’t trigger it; even my “oh shit” braking into a posted 10mph curve didn’t trigger it, but I have progressive braking drilled into my head. Owner’s manual states that BCS2 will change cornering characteristics if you’re on a track pushing it hard, so maybe this is only for extreme cornering. Quick Shifter: It is a little spongey below 3k RPM so I’ve pretty much stopped using it when going from gears 1 to 2 or 2 down to 1 when putting around in town. Other: Side cases fit my XL full face helmet, but you must flip the helmet upside-down. Take the saddlebags off and the stubby back end makes the bike kind of look like a streetfighter. Radiator hose is routed differently and is now as low and exposed as the painfully unprotected oil-sump; at this point the bike needs to just come with a guard or plate of some kind from factory. Passenger grab handles are very solid, now retained with a tamper-proof torx. The entire subframe seems to have been greatly beefed up, I had my camping gear on the back the entire time and it never seemed to upset the chassis. The blue wheel paint gets a lot of attention and comments from people, like every stop. Bike is running beautifully at this point; just going to do an oil and filter change for the first service and look everything over. If anyone wants pictures of anything specific, please request! Cheers, and a happy 4th to those of you stateside! J
    6 points
  21. I recently joined looking for a cheap solution for highway pegs. After getting some inspiration from here and finding the passenger pegs my dad took off his Indian, I managed to put together what I think is a fairly elegant solution.
    5 points
  22. Another data-point in the discussion - myself and Warchild-wife recently did a stint in central Nevada. Following numbers represent 2-up, full FJR1300 side bags and a full Shad40 - so we're heavy by factory standards. Day 1, I was in a hurry to get to Ely, and really rampaged the roads in a naughty fashion. Setting the cruise-control at 85+ ranges for hundreds of miles at a time. First tank was 41mpg, the 2nd was 39mpg. ☹️ Day 2, I purposely kept the cruise control at a painful 67-mph, and was rewarded with a solid 53-54mpg. For the amount of weight the bike is carrying, I find this exceptional. It's allows for a reasonable 200+ mile range. At least the price of boredom speeds is knowing you can make it to the next dusty Nevada town, and hope there is available fuel. 👍
    5 points
  23. I rode it around. And around, and around… Here’s an entertaining GPS trace:
    5 points
  24. Shifting less isn't going to be good or bad for the engine - assuming both cases involve not doing anything silly like lugging the engine. IMHO, the bike is MUCH more fun to ride at higher RPM. That's a big part of why I went up a couple teeth on the rear sprocket, in fact. You've got (much) more power on tap, and the engine sounds amazing. Also, it's less "work". Aside from launches, I'm *always* over 5k. Interestingly, I haven't found this makes a significant difference in terms of fuel economy, either. *shrugs* On the flip side, I feel riding like the manual recommends (ever look at the recommended shift points in the manual?) is horrifying, keeping the bike in an RPM range where the engine feels flat and incredibly boring.
    5 points
  25. Funny, just last night my buddy who also owns a 2015 FJ asked me if I was considering adding another bike to the garage. The local Yamaha shop just got a nearly brand new Ducati Hypermotard 939 SP on a trade in, which I consider one of the ultimate hooligan machines. While I am not in the market for a different bike, it definitely stopped me in my tracks and got my mind wandering...
    5 points
  26. It's often said that riding a motorcycle is cheaper than therapy, and you folks have been a great therapist. Life is indeed too short. My particular challenge, as stated above, is my simultaneous desires for pure speed, reliability and ease of repair, and flat out style. No one bike has all of that as even my Connie, which came closest, faded after 3 years. I can't stop looking at the Moto Guzzi Stelvio, a tractor of a bike, which I find beautiful and in some ways is easy to repair (Valves in 20 minutes!) and in other ways, well, Italian. And I lust after a Busa, don't shoot me. I almost always buy used, and always pay cash, and my wife mocks me, but from trading bikes for bikes I haven't spent much new money in quite a while. Love this forum, keep it real folks.
    5 points
  27. It's not that you have a problem. Just that you're hanging out with the wrong people. Us! My friend had a fixation on owning just one perfect bike. Of course he never found it, spent an ungodly amount of money trying, and bitched endlessly about how much he missed damn near every bike he ever sold. I, being of unsound mind and proud of it, have always wanted a garage that would be easily mistaken for the Barber Motorsports Museum. My wife thinks I'm crazy, but who is she to talk? She married me after all... Stop worrying, grab your gear and go take a ride. You'll feel much better.
    5 points
  28. Cruise control is the one thing that I did not want/need on a bike, until I got a bike with cruise control. I will never own another street bike without it.
    5 points
  29. EarPeace, they also filter out specific frequencies based on the cores/filters that you insert. I run them with the medium insert and can still hear people talking just fine. The double-flange works best for me in regards to comfort; can wear all day. This is going to be a very subjective thing: I tried three-flanged designs and they hurt bad. Foam tips work well for me for about 1.5hrs then they get a hotspot.
    5 points
  30. I have the Evotech and it has already saved my radiator. Impacting object left a dent in the radiator guard grill (easily tapped back flat) but my radiator is fine. Very easy to install on the 2020 Tracer.
    5 points
  31. The more I read about other peoples' experience with the T9GT the more I'm convinced the bike was made for people 5'9" and shorter I think the stock windscreen sucks, yet people here are posting that it's wonderful and mentioning they're between 5'7" and 5'9". I think the gauges are hard to use because I have to look down to see them, and again people who are 5'9" or shorter are saying they're great. I'm closer to 5'11" than I am 5'10"; 180cm. It's crazy how different the experience is on the same bike. Next big advance in motorcycle technology: tiltable/adjustable gauges?
    5 points
  32. They still run in the rain. Put on a poncho and ride.
    5 points
  33. So I guess I’ll be the one to point out that @wordsmithis back in a motorcycle dealership, looking at Yamaha triples. Again.
    5 points
  34. Many of the torque values are well known to be way too high in the owners manual. Of course its only my practice but I have never used a torque wrench on a drain plug or filter on any vehicle I have ever owned in over 40+ years, hand tight snug and then just a few degrees more is all I use. YMMV.
    5 points
  35. rode down to Carson City through Mound House to NV 341 quick lunch in virginia city, NV
    5 points
  36. Just a reminder for everyone, there are no Phillips screws on your bike or anything not made here. They are JIS screws. You must get a JIS driver for them.
    4 points
  37. It’s a pretty creative new project from the Texas DOT to cross the Intercoastal Waterway at Sargent Beach. Coming south, it’s 720 degrees of left-handers, with half uphill & half downhill. Heading back north, it’s 720 degrees of right-handers…
    4 points
  38. Left Edmonton for Canmore on Wednesday: https://livetrack.garmin.com/session/75766fa2-e5d6-4dc3-aa35-44e4bbec8de7/token/289A5DD6A03F8D3D4BB479E5F9D7AA6E Canmore to Invermere yesterday: https://livetrack.garmin.com/session/ffee4564-e3b2-4ea2-ac7c-0e33a3b3edad/token/F8F0411E14F6E455934784FE2C9C865B
    4 points
  39. I'm not sure about shifting less, but it *feels* like shifting at higher RPM makes the shift(s) smoother.
    4 points
  40. I have many and cycle through them (pun intended). I actually sold my FJ earlier this year. I'll probably snag a GT in a few more years. In the meantime, I'm enjoying a Daytona 675 & Aprilia SXV550. My only recommendation is buy used & pay cash.
    4 points
  41. Seems like a weird choice when you can just pop the axle out, and you have to pop the axle out to remove the wheel anyways. I mean: Remove caliper Remove axle nut Slide axle out Roll wheel forward and derail chain Roll wheel out.
    4 points
  42. +1 for the DID. I used a JT dampened front and supersprox stealth for the rear.
    4 points
  43. I’ve done three ride outs with our bike club. We’re all advanced motorcyclist instructors, we use a rear sweeper and use a system where we take it in turns to mark junctions.....and I still don’t enjoy them. I ride to enjoy myself, go where I want, stop when I want etc and although our group rides are safe, they’re all the things I don’t like doing. Lone riding is my preference by far.
    4 points
  44. I am 6' 3" with a long torso. I tried both the V-Stream sport touring (medium) and touring (large). They were a little better than stock, but still pretty noisy. Earplugs were mandatory. Now I have a 26" Madstad and it's far better IMO. I usually ride without earplugs now, airflow is pretty smooth and quiet. The Madstad is expensive but worth it.
    4 points
  45. Reason enough to stick with my 15, I can flat foot it even holding a dog & suds LOL
    4 points
  46. I only made it as far as 'breakfast tacos' and stopped reading. 😋
    4 points
  47. I run in the mid 40's pretty much full time. The fact that I live over an hour away from any straight piece of road longer than ~1/2 mile might have something to do with that. But honestly, the fact that I've never backed away from the least excuse to twist the throttle *just* that little bit more is the most likely causative factor. Besides, it's fun! To quote the great sage Jimmy Buffett: "Growing older, but not up"
    4 points
  48. First valves check at 60.000km. All valve clearances are within specs!
    4 points
  49. Just to be different again. The foam on the stock seat is not bad it just locks your ass into what the designers must feel is the perfect placement (usually a styling decision). Staying in one position builds butt cheek hot spots. In the old days seats were flat so you could move around. If you are handy with tools and have a 4.5" grinder or random orbital sander you can flatten out the stock seat and for me with no real ass flesh it is good for 500 miles I have had multiple corbin, saddlemen and sargeant seats. None worked as well for my puny butt as just flattening the stock seat to my own tastes.
    4 points
  50. I installed an EK screw link with a new chain before I rode from Wisconsin to the Arctic Ocean last summer. Install was super easy and haven't had a problem - including on the Dempster Highway. I'll buy it again.
    4 points

×