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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/07/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Another set of sweepers
  2. 3 points
    Beautiful places to ride. Was there 2 months ago. Trinity Lake below.
  3. 3 points
    The important thing is finding something that works for you and sticking with it, the internet can give you thousands of different ideas and opinions and even possibly make you start to doubt your decisions. Go with what you know. To be fair though, I'm with everyone else on here that has chimed in, I have NEVER heard of anyone actually using 42psi in the rear, and definitely not in the front. But like I said, if it works for you and the bike isn't behaving oddly because of it, don't change from what works for YOU.
  4. 2 points
    So after seeking the opinion of others and experience of the stock screen for the last 600 miles from new, (not good!) I have opted for the Puig Touring screen based on my previous experience of one of their screens (on a Honda) and the quality. So far it I would say it has transformed my rider experience for the better. No real pressure on my upper body any more and a lot quieter on my helmet depending on the height adjustment of the screen, as a 6 ft rider I am delighted.!
  5. 2 points
    FJR’s recommended pressure is 39 psi Front, so 42 isn’t too unreasonable. Others that come to mind are ST1300s, GL1800 wings and Hayabusas. (39-42psi range). Like Betoney said, use what works for you. However, I WOULD NOT recommend exceeding the maximum psi listed on the sidewall of the tire! common theme of all those bikes? Heavy bikes that may “push” a bit while cornering. IMHO..... -Skip
  6. 2 points
    This was my favorite place today. I'm on the road , in the RV, .and always looking for a good ride wherever I land. Today it was Minnesota 1 from the coast to Ely. Excellent to brand new road surfaces, extremely light traffic and 80 degree temperatures. The total ride was 245 miles to reach about 90 miles (45 miles one way) of perfect sweepers. All in all a great day
  7. 2 points
    As the celebrated but risque American film-star Mae West said "is that a bent key in your pocket or are you just pleased to see me?"
  8. 1 point
    The first time I ever rode up there I was heading up toward the summit and encountered a logging truck coming down... completely took me by surprise. I don’t know how they make it through some of those tight curves.
  9. 1 point
    Piston kit, 8.5 springs, oil. Razor R.
  10. 1 point
    Not too fixated on the manual's numbers nor the marks next to the sight glass. For all my Yamahas I usually dump in 20% less than what manual calls for, filling till the sight glass is about 75%. Bring it up to temp, shut off, wait for settle, top off till there's just a sliver in the sight glass. It's kept anything from coming out the breather and kept the level light happy.
  11. 1 point
    We were just up there about 6 weeks ago, a lovely morning ride out of Redding. Yes, what a fantastic road!
  12. 1 point
    I'm not sure, when I do my giant chicken impression I can see bicep. When the moroon loosened my right mirror I got home looking at my glove.
  13. 1 point
    39 must be something new. My FJR o.m has the typical 36/36 and 36/42 recommendation based on loading. I run 36-40 cold in the FJR depending upon the tire's carcass stiffness. I would never recommend anybody start with max pressure from the sidewall but if it's there in writing then you know it's within design parameters and will have some flex. Due to the varied experience of forum readers my suggestion is always start with the manual's recommendation (which is conservative) and experiment +/- in small increments, measure cold vs operating, learn to read tires, find what works for you. '05 FJR OM:
  14. 1 point
    Yes, but only when it is closed. 😁
  15. 1 point
    @roadrash83 - No clearance issues at all. Check out this post and vid from @Husqy on the Soundbomb mini
  16. 1 point
  17. 1 point
    Yes I was referring to the Denali Soundbomb mini. It's super easy to install (approx 2 mins). Literally, just requires you to unscrew the OEM horn, unplug the 2 wires, replug the wires into the Denali and screw the horn on the bracket. In terms of volume I would say it is NOT significantly louder than the OEM one but is much deeper so it means other road users hear it a lot better. Cars wouldn't bat an eyelid when I used to beep the horn but always turn to look with the Denali
  18. 1 point
    According to Joe - yes. I'm hoping for the installation to be done on Aug 19th, obviously depending on arrival of the K-tech parts. I'll post some pix of the finished job, and maybe even one or two of the actual installation, if he'll let me hang around! I'm deferring my planned two-day ~1000km circuit until the job is done, which over that distance and many varied road surfaces and conditions should give me an excellent feel for the results, and the ability to get things fine-tuned if necessary.
  19. 1 point
    I had duplicate keys made for mine, the metal is much better, and it doesn't bend.
  20. 1 point
    I got my GT flashed by Ivan as well. I was actually the first Tracer owner to get his flash done. Saw on facebook that he just finished the tune and my ecu was shipped to him the next day. I've had his work before. He will get my business again.
  21. 1 point
    I came to the Tracer from a Ninja 1000. Whilst my front tire wasn’t worn as above, I can safely say that the Yamaha handles so much nicer than the Kawi did. I think for me it has to do with the steering geometry and wider handle bars. They just work better for me. Rob
  22. 1 point
    In Fremantle Western Australia on a glorious winters day.............
  23. 1 point
    Nice, now what’s the next challenge?
  24. 1 point
    Put on a new PR5 but I've only achieved level 2 fun so far. Never noticed the lines before this post.
  25. 1 point
    Even different profile tires that are new will have different characteristics. Some will fall into a corner more than others. I like to look at bikes, but usually walk away happy with what I have. I did an hour long test ride on a R1200RS, and liked it. But all the time I was thinking I'd have to change this and change that...just to get it to the place where my own bike was already. And I look at the difference of the money I'd get for selling my bike and how much the new bike is...plus those farkles...and realize I'd be spending a LOT of money and getting very little back in performance or comfort. Chris
  26. 1 point
    He complained that his Ninja was "fighting" him in turns before we swapped and afterwards was amazed at how effortless the FJ was in the corners. It definitely resisted turning, but when we stopped, I pointed at his worn out front tire as the culprit and not the weight of the bike. He's still fairly new to road bikes and that front tire was 3 flat angles with no roundness left at all. Literally shaped like /▔\. So yeah, I can't really comment on how the steering felt and let him know that replacing that front will feel like a new motorcycle.
  27. 1 point
    Also posted on the GT Discussion sections of this Forum... Intrigued by the very positive comments here about K-tech suspension parts, I took myself off to a local suspension guru this morning, who advertises that he uses this UK brand. The business is called Ride Dynamics, so that’s a good start! It’s only about a 30 minutes drive from home, so a consultation to get a feel of the business owner seemed worthwhile. And it was – the workshop was spotless, a place for everything and everything in its place, as was the office. Joe was working on some fork legs when I arrived, and spread out on a steel-topped bench were assorted parts including steel shims so thin I could almost see through them. I’d never before seen the innards of the fork – only pictures – and it looked mighty complex. It reinforced my intention to have a professional do the work – I have neither the tools nor the expertise. We talked about my requirements, chiefly a Rolls Royce (or Cadillac) ride. Joe is familiar with the shortcomings of Tracer suspension, saying that he had at least two MT-09s in his workshop every month for upgrades, and indeed there were two such bikes there awaiting work, along with many others. I was quite impressed with the apparent know-how that Joe exhibited, his willingness to listen and discuss, and the options he offered – all without calling me ‘mate’ all the time. Upshot is that we have agreed an all-up price – labour plus K-tech parts plus setting-up the bike when done – of just over AUD$2100 (USD$1425, Euro €1270, GBP£1171). By no means cheap, but if it gives the improvement I’m looking for in ride comfort I may not need to later buy the ~$500 Bagster seat (at least, that’s what I’m telling Mrs Wordsmith)! I hope that the availability of the required parts here in Oz is such that the work can be done quite soon so that I can test things on a planned short-ish ~1000km two-day loop. Then, a real work-out of two much longer multi-day tours each of ~4500km later in the year. Stay tuned for updates and objective comments, which I'll post on the GT Discussion section of this Forum..
  28. 1 point
    Intrigued by the very positive comments here about the gains that can be made with various after-market suspension parts, I took myself off to a local suspension guru this morning, who advertises that he uses the highly-praised UK brand K-tech. The business is called Ride Dynamics, so that’s a good start! Thanks to captainscarlet for introducing me to K-tech. It’s only about a 30 minutes drive from home, so a consultation to get a feel of the business and its owner seemed worthwhile. And it was – the workshop was spotless, a place for everything and everything in its place, as was the office. Joe was working on some fork legs when I arrived, and spread out on a steel-topped bench were assorted parts including steel shims so thin I could almost see through them. I’d never before seen the innards of the fork – only pictures – and it looked mighty complex. It reinforced my intention to have a professional do the work – I have neither the tools nor the expertise. We talked about my requirements, chiefly a Rolls Royce (or Cadillac) ride. Joe is familiar with the shortcomings of Tracer suspension, saying that he had at least two MT-09s in his workshop every month for upgrades, and indeed there were two such bikes there awaiting work, along with many others. I was quite impressed with the apparent know-how that Joe exhibited, his willingness to listen and discuss, and the options he offered – all without calling me ‘mate’ all the time. Upshot is that we have agreed an all-up price – labour plus K-tech parts plus setting-up the bike when done – of just over AUD$2100 (USD$1425, Euro €1270, GBP£1171). This includes the new Razor-R rear shock as well as fork internals upgrades. By no means cheap, but if it gives the improvement I’m looking for in ride comfort I may not later need to buy the ~AUD$500 Bagster seat (at least, that’s what I’m telling Mrs Wordsmith)! I hope that the availability of the required parts here in Oz is such that the work can be done quite soon so that I can test things on a planned short-ish ~1000km two-day loop. Then, I'll have a real work-out on two much longer multi-day tours each of ~4500km later in the year. Stay tuned for updates and objective comments.
  29. 1 point
    Koth...Thanks for the advice!! I'm super lucky that there are so many awesome riding adventures so close to me. Riding the Malaysia Peninsula, Thailand, Viet Nam, Laos...they are all less than three hours away!! And the bonus here is that there are scores of people who are retired early that have the bikes, the time, and desire to do touring rides. I promise I will post up some of our adventures.
  30. 1 point
    I've been waiting for this...
  31. 1 point
    Hi! -Installed Frame Sliders today. OES Yamaha Tracer 900/900 GT Front & Rear Frame Sliders 2019 -Ordered some Yamaha turn signals from EBay. I hope they end up working —they’re from the UK. I saw someone on this forum has them. The dealership couldn’t confirm but I went ahead and ordered them up. If anyone has input on these I”m all ears! THANKS! yamaha genuine accessories YME-FLB2F-10-00 LED Flashers Plus Front
  32. 1 point
    Interesting. Yet another refinement detail that Yamaha improved with the new model Tracers... The more you look, the more subtle differences you find.
  33. 1 point
    Done it more times than I care to admit. Key is made of cheese. Fortunately in the GT the key is now well-placed to avoid that - see pic with BMW tag.. Good enough reason to swap?
  34. 1 point
    This. Cheap Chinese doesn't bother me here. I reserve my cringe for those using cheap cast levers and pegs with giant voids in them that will ruin your day in much more dramatic ways.
  35. 1 point
    Get a cheap ebay one, but loctite the screws in as they fall out easily. It doesnt matter that they are light alloy as they only take a static force.
  36. 1 point
    Evaporative Cooling Vest - Pro's or Con's?? By betoney, May 17, 2018 in Gear Reviews I just read the above thread and also a linked article about riding in extreme heat. I would say that I'm pretty fortunate to have survived riding 3/4 of the day out in the desert and even the mountains were extremely hot. First off I have to say that I didn't realize that where we were staying was in the desert. When I got out riding I was naive and totally unprepared. I felt fine until mid afternoon. Being from the east coast, you get used to humidity when it's hot so you feel uncomfortable as you become soaking wet from sweating. As I've now found out, in the hot desert your sweat is evaporating so fast that you never get saturated like I'm used to when it's hot. I never felt uncomfortable while riding. It was only when I stopped that I felt bad and knew I was overheating. LOL... someone suggested I check the coolant on the bike but in fact it was myself that needed checking. I did know enough to keep stopping and drink a lot of liquids but that wasn't enough. I purposely left my jacket home and only wore a long sleeve shirt to keep from getting sunburned. I've always wondered why you always see people in the desert wearing a lot of layers and now I know that it's to insulate themselves against the heat. I had no clue. I sent my helmet, shoes and gloves out and could have easily included my jacket. I only wish I knew what I was up against and bought a cooling vest which is only $50 and brought my jacket. I had an incredible day in spite of my ignorance and made it back to my hotel through sheer force of will. This article also said that it takes a day or two to recover and you are susceptible to heat stroke in a shorter time in the following days and that's exactly what happened. The next morning I had to return the rental bike and had an hour and a half through the desert and although I didn't get heat stroked out again I was pretty much toasted for the rest of the day. I decided to add this to this post because for anyone thinking of riding out in the desert and has no experience as I didn't. That place can kill you if your not prepared and this is not an exaggeration. Do your homework and it'll be one of the coolest places you'll ever see and you'll be ok. Otherwise someone will find your bleached out skeleton and will steal you skull to show to their friends as a trophy they found.
  37. 1 point
    I'm back from my California trip. The wedding was a drag but the bike rental was probably the best ride of my life. First off, I rented a 2017 FZ 09 on Riders-Share and it was excellent. Got a great motorcycle from a great guy. The FZ 09 feels very similar to my FJ 09 except for I have K-Tech on both ends of my bike and it makes a big difference. Still, the FZ09 with stock suspension is a pretty good ride. Ok, about the ride. The guy I rented from recommended one of the routes that Chitown did and told me it was his favorite. I had an hour ride out through the desert from my hotel to the mountains. One cool thing about this area of the desert is that there are these areas with dips and rises and at speed you feel like you're gonna get launched. I actually broke out into a huge smile at one point. After about an hour it went from straight to starting to get a little curvey and then as I started to go up the mountains, it became holy shit cool. Twisty doesn't even begin to describe it. Short tight turns that had me flicking the bike back and forth, close tight turns like I've never seen. Cut backs, hairpin turns and elevation changes that just never ended and a gazillion turns that that never stopped. The route is nicknamed "The Rim of the World" and it is like someone designed a road for maximum motorcycling fun. Now I have to explain something. I've been riding for most of my life and I'm 62. Almost all of my experience has been off road so I'm always working on improving my pavement skills. Recently I've been trying to figure out trail braking and trying to incorporate it into my riding but haven't found any improvement or understood what it was really going to give me. So on this ride through the mountains I finally discovered and figured out trail braking and damn, I was riding twice as fast through turns and it just became the most natural thing ever. I was able to just crank into and out of turns fast and comfortably. It's so simple and it set me free. So back to the ride..... There are lots of cars and bikes up there and it's mostly single lane except for a few sections of passing lanes. No matter what people up there are driving, they think they become speed racer. SUV's and mini vans become Ferraris. Of course there was nothing up there that could touch a decent sport bike and so besides the technical aspect of riding up there, there were lots of bonsai passes. At one point I got behind 3 Harley baggers and all of a sudden they they are trying to ride like they're on crotch rockets. That didn't last long as I could see how ragged and bad handling those bikes really are and they waved me by and pulled over never to be seen again. The funny thing is nobody wants to get passed and worked their asses off to keep me from passing them. Most gave up and eventually would pull over and let me pass. Others I had to find a spot and blast by. There was one guy in a Beemer (car) that decided he wanted to race and when we hit the passing lane section his driving became maniacal in trying to keep me from passing him. The funny thing was that it wasn't even challenging on a motorcycle. I dusted him and he fading back into the distance. After a few hours I started coming down out of the mountains and finally back into the desert and much to my surprise I ended up on old Route 66 which was way cool. Eventually I made my way to Barstow and took a good look at my Google maps and realized I had a pretty long ride back to where I was staying. The map routed me to Route 58 which goes through the heart of the Mojave Desert. I'll say this about the desert.....it is hot as a MFer........but the Mojave Desert was twice as hot as a MFer. I did not see many bikes in the desert and I'm guessing it's because although I loved riding out there, I didn't realize that the desert heat is slowly sucking the life out of you. I started out the day around 8 AM as suggested here and I hydrated my ass off often. Although you're extremely hot, the dryness of the heat keeps you from feeling really uncomfortable. I rode the desert roads at 90 to 100 mph most of the time and went through 5 tanks of gas during the course of the day. After an hour on RT 58 I started getting low on fuel and finally had the fuel light start blinking and showing 12 miles of gas left...........and nothing but desert and highway as far as I could see. I started getting really nervous as the heat here was getting to me and I was scared shitless about running out there. On top of that, I was starting to feel kind of nauseous which is a sign of heat stroke. Finally I saw a mobile mechanic working on a tractor trailer and I stopped to see if he had any gas. This is when I discovered that I had full blown heat stroke. The mechanic didn't have any gas but he did give me a bottle of very warm water. I had to lay down in the shadow of the truck and sipped water and I was seriously worried. After about 10 minutes I felt well enough to get up and Google gas stations nearest my location. This is the funny part, it was only 2 miles down the road. I hopped on the bike and rode there and filled up. Ate half of a miserable gas station sandwich and a bottle of Gatorade and sat in the shade. I was fully heat stroking out and knew I had to get back as quickly as possible. So back on the bike and I rode like a maniac to make time as I knew I wasn't going to last long. It's an interesting thing, I didn't feel bad when I was riding but when I stopped for gas or to hydrate I knew I was in trouble. Even so, I still was having a blast riding through the desert at 100 mph to make time. It's a weird cool place. Around 5 o'clock I rolled into the hotel parking lot and just about crawled to my room. I was not in good shape and really should have gotten help. Instead I jumped into an ice cold shower and just stayed in there for a long time and then cranked the AC and laid on the bed drinking cold water. On top of that my wrists and hands were sore as hell from twisting the gas and squeezing the clutch all day. At 6 o'clock I got dressed and went to the wedding rehearsal dinner. The hardest part was that there was nobody that rode and I didn't have anyone to talk about this amazing ride. The next morning we got up and went out for breakfast and then my GF took the car out and I took the bike to return it. We went separately so could let it loose for a last hour through the desert. It was great but I was pretty used up from the previous day. The next day we drove down to San Diego and I got to stand in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans a month apart then flew back to Massachusetts the following day. That's my story and I'm stickin to it.

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