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chitown

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chitown last won the day on March 22

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About chitown

  • Birthday 02/13/1959

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  1. It does... but only through a limited range of the available travel and thus not very effective.
  2. Galfer FJ-09 5 line instructions https://galferusa.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/D809-5-Instructions.pdf
  3. Balancing obsession should be informed by riding with no weight, purposely too little or too much weight, etc. It's science you can do yourself rather than take the internet's word for it The bike won't pitch you down the road. You might be surprised. Color matched gaffer tape on all weights. YMMV.
  4. There's a design choice as to where the physical throttle tube movement is converted into signals sent over the wire. Cost is usually a factor. Think of the cables as part of the input device. Scotty, we need moar power!
  5. Love my Vesrah pads. If you don't believe rubber lines should be replaced in four years, don't. While they will improve feel a bit I always wait to upgrade the lines until I'm ready to replace the oem lines. If you don't trust the factory guidelines but trust your ability to inspect/replace when necessary it's all good. If you don't wish to replace the hard lines shop for lines that don't. There's no single objective answer to this imo. Hard lines can get damaged, rust, and if they need to be replaced at some point it might be made simpler by going all flex to begin with. Nobody wants to be in the position of having to order stock hard lines and install them and getting custom aftermarket hard lines or making yourself is possible but certainly more of a pita than with flex. I don't always replace hard lines with flex line upgrades but will consider: Do sellers offer kits that retain the stock hard lines? Will it result in fewer line junctions? More real estate for other items or maintenance? Will it be easier to bleed? EG my Miata has a clutch line in three sections, two hard, one flex. One of the hard lines is near a wheel and more prone to rust, damage, known to cause bleeding issues and takes up a lot of real estate. The other section is on the firewall, nice and tidy, unlikely to ever get damaged, etc. But keeping it means more junctions. The sellers offer options to replace it all with one run or anything in between. Deciding is owner preference. As to pulsing if you're certain it's not a disc or pad surface issue I'd check the runout.
  6. None handy but if you search for "dryver" here or on advrider you should find a few threads of folks that have done this on a variety of bags.
  7. Added a $20 ring setup and a piece of cutting board for stiffness to a strap on Cortech in the gear closet. Been using it for four years and works great. After decades of other mounting systems I'm all ring now.
  8. Extended warranties are far and away rarely worth what folks pay for them. Have only ever considered them for first year models or a vehicle that had a major repair during the standard warranty period. With my Versys, it had a warranty repair at 6 months that was 50% of the value of the bike so just before the factory warranty ran out went on ebay and bought a Good Times extended warranty from a big box multi brand dealer in Colorado at half what Kawasaki started out asking. Didn't use it. My '15 being first model year and some of the valve issues reported here made me think about one the final month of standard warranty. Called the same dealer and they said the manufacturers will no longer allow them to undercut dealers that are in states with regulated insurance rates. Cali is such a state so they wouldn't sell to me. Florida and Washington are similar. At the time I was piling up a lot of miles and decided to get it. My commute situ changed so mileage hasn't been high and with 8 months left on the extended haven't used it. You can be sure I'll be doing a valve check before it runs out regardless of mileage lol. Since you're in KY if you really want one consider waiting till it's near out of factory warranty then go shopping on ebay.
  9. Definitely has its limitations but I've been happy with mine owned for five years so wouldn't call it disposable nor junk. Five years of ride videos, underwater stuff, and for me it paid for itself with the memories recorded from the first trip with it in Ireland. A lot less bulk to deal with than my friends that ran elaborate setups. But I doubt it's appropriate for vlogging. No option for hard power without compromising the weather resistance, no external mic port but I'm not sure what folks do for audio. I generally just put music on my videos that youtube won't flag for copyright. Can't stand spoken vlogging but that's just me As to mounting, move mine around a lot. On the helmet for commuting or a borrowed bike. Have done some lower mounting positions but have gone through multiple lens covers due to rock strikes. And, have to remember to clean it of bugs.
  10. tl;dr While the Alaska stuff is well-made and some love it it had no benefit for me so sold mine after a 6k trip with it. Also not a fan of anything gel. === I do endurance riding on everything from stock seats to $500 customs to dirt bike seats. Anything that changes the pressure points helps for awhile though. Thus, any seat that's level and doesn't have too well defined of a bucket is helpful as I can change positions a bit throughout the day. Gel tends to pack and retain heat. Have used Airhawk, Sargeant, Corbin, various bicycle shorts and apparel etc. At this point if spending more than $50 will just wait till ready to do a ride in appointment with a custom seat maker with whom I can test the seat during the process and have adjustments made before it's covered. Since I'm west coast have done that in the past with Bill Mayer Saddles (run by one son, Rocky) and Rick Mayer (the other son who went north and last I heard wasn't in the biz any longer). Both good for the half ton any day. On a budget, there are inexpensive inflatable pads that store flat in luggage for part of the day then can be in/deflated to various degrees throughout the day to change the pressure points. Think I still have the one I paid $25 for from ShadeTree 15 years ago when I toured the DRZ and couldn't bring myself to put a custom on it
  11. Like my Givi monokey case and rack. Found a Givi case and racks used ~15 years ago on fleabay. The case has been on five different bikes now, has seen hard core usage, and is still going strong. As I've sold/bought other bikes have either fabbed a mount (rear seat mount), used a Givi universal plate when the bike already had a rack, or bought a bike-specific mount from Givi. Some items you might want to consider while shopping: - Are you running or planning to run side luggage that might conflict with the hardware from the case? This might not even be an issue for the FJ-09 but has been for some others. Since I only ever run a top case these days not a concern for me. - Is look of the rack when there's no luggage mounted a concern? EG my case never leaves the bike so don't really care. There are some slick-looking options for racks that will often work with various brands of luggage. - Will you ride with a passenger? Some rack and case combinations are fixed at one spot while others may allow some adjustment. Some offer nice back pads as options.
  12. 29" inseam, right knee replaced. When there's no luggage on the rear seat I swing it over and when there is just raise it up and over. Never got into using the peg or riding off center stand but have known a few riders not much over 5' tall that were well-practiced at both.
  13. Then you don't need to add oil. Carry on.
  14. Damage, no. Annoying light yes But it's trivial to get it right without the weird obsessing in oil threads like this one and other Yamaha model boards. Ride more worry less.
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