Jump to content

spartacus

Member
  • Content Count

    34
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

50 Good

About spartacus

  • Birthday 03/04/1985

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Welcome! Northern Bmore County here. Maybe I'll seeya around
  2. It should be a blinking sticky at the top of each page. If anybody complains about a snatchy throttle or janky fueling, this should be the only reply until they do it. It's not hard at all and completely changes the bike's livability for me—especially because I'm in traffic when I commute. I just wish we didn't have to do it to achieve what it should have been stock since it's the adjustment of a sensor already on the bike.
  3. I was tired of my Cortech saddlebags sagging so much, especially when I had them packed full for commuting to work. Gym bag, lunch, laptop and such. They unzip and expand so I might as well use it, right? Grabbed two pieces of 1x12x3/16” steel and two pieces of 1/4” or 3/16” (I can’t remember) steel rod from the orange Depot. Cut the steel strips to length (about 12”) and drilled two holes to mount. Used the stock hardware and spacers. Heated and bent the steel rod to shape, by eye for the most part. I went back to the bike constantly with the bags mounted to make sure the shape was right. Then I welded the rods onto the bars, ground down the monstrous boogers that I call welds down nice and smooth, and shot it with a few layers of gloss black. They work great and I’m very pleased. I don’t really load them down that much, not compared to if they were hard bags, so I don’t think I need a cross bar for support. The stock is thick enough and I believe my welds were good enough that they aren’t going anywhere. I’ll monitor and add one or two if need be.
  4. I was tired of my Cortech saddlebags sagging so much, especially when I had them packed full for commuting to work. Gym bag, lunch, laptop and such. They unzip and expand so I might was use it, right? Grabbed two pieces of 1x12x3/16” steel and two pieces of 1/4” or 3/16” (I can’t remember) steel rod from the orange Depot. Cut the steel strips to length (about 12”) and drilled two holes to mount. Used the stock hardware and spacers. Heated and bent the steel rod to shape, by eye for the most part. I went back to the bike constantly with the bags mounted to make sure the shape was right. Then I welded the rods onto the bars, ground down the monstrous boogers that I call welds down nice and smooth, and shot it with a few layers of gloss black. They work great and I’m very pleased. I don’t really load them down that much, not compared to if they were hard bags, so I don’t think I need a cross bar for support. The stock is thick enough and I believe my welds were good enough that they aren’t going anywhere. I’ll monitor and add one or two if need be.
  5. I'm kind of an odd bird: the FJ is my third motorcycle since 2008 / ~55,000 mi. Both of my previous bikes were Buells: a 2003 XB9R in white, and a 2009 1125CR in red. Both were really cool engineering-wise and quite unique with the CR only having 3,099 made worldwide. They handled like they were superglued to the road surface. I wouldn't change anything about the power or handling, at all. The Buell community is also something that I haven't found an equal to ... something about a niche brand brings owners and enthusiasts in tight. I'd change the reliability of the CR: had multiple problems keeping it on the road. Stator and rotor, VRs, hydraulic clutch weep, and keeping a good battery in the darn thing. I wish they'd stuck the 1125 Rotax-built Helicon engine into a taller, adventure-type bike like the Ulysses. That's ultimately why I had to sell—my body (read: back) couldn't handle the ergonomics anymore over longer rides, including commuting two hours per day. I needed something more upright. Thus, the FJ fills the voids and only leaves me wishing for a little more grunt down low (MT-10 GT)!
  6. How exactly did you hack the stock exhaust? You take a drill and drill small holes in the baffle or something? I removed the exhaust, cut a window in the rear top portion behind the mounts, and removed the tubing connecting the muffler wall to the exhaust tip. Then we cut an additional 1.75" dia hole in that partition wall that basically leads to the catalytic converter. It makes it more straight through, with the expense of a few pops and bangs (coming to a stop, downshifting into 3rd and 2nd below 3k rpm or so).
  7. I hacked the stock exhaust for a little more volume and a lower overall tone. I achieved about 80% of what I wanted—could have been louder and deeper! But it worked out fine for a free mod.
  8. Always room for more mods! My wallet dislikes your comment, especially after saving some money by modding the muffler myself! So I was able to take a 30 min ride in between storm clouds and the exhaust definitely sounds better. It's deeper and louder overall, especially climbing past 6k rpm under heavy load. It pops and cracks decelerating under about 3k rpm while downshifting. I kind of like it. For now. I know when it gets super hot out and I've been riding for a while it'll get annoying. We'll see! I definitely enjoy being able to hear the engine over the intake howl and engine noise, even with earplugs in. It could be louder and deeper, though. If I were to do it again, I'd have the hole in the catalytic converter partition wall made larger. It's about 1.75" dia now; so like 2.5" perhaps. Worthwhile mod, though.
  9. That's unfortunate ... I really hope it doesn't do that. We'll see! The extra hole he put in for me definitely wasn't a small one.
  10. Here’s some shots showing the muffler looking as stock as can be, albeit a few welds on top. Polished up those headers, too.
  11. I had the stock exhaust modified to be a bit louder and deeper. Performance gains are definitely not the goal, though welcome. I miss the torque of the 1125. It definitely achieves the sound goals: much deeper, only a bit louder than stock at idle. Once you rev it, the volume increases with rpm and gets a pinch raspy. I imagine downshifts popping a bit (too rainy here to test ride).
  12. Put two tanks of gas through after the APS adjustment and my opinion is the bike should have come stock like this. Everything has smoothed out, even in A mode. Much, much nicer overall. I changed the oil and oil filter over the weekend and secretly hoped that would quiet the engine down a bit, but it didn’t. Shifting is much nicer, though (I just used Yamalube). The rattles at idle with the bike in neutral and clutch out worries me, though I know this CP3 engine is kind of clanky. I think I want to do the manual CCT soon.
  13. I was able to adjust the APS yesterday and took a quick jaunt to the end of the driveway and back. It felt much smoother during the on/off throttle transition and I’m excited to see how effortless traffic will be now. The actual procedure is a breeze: I used a 1/4”-drive socket wrench with a 5/16” (or 8 mm) thin wall socket and didn’t have to make any special tool or anything to get the two APS screws. Before: Menu 14 — 17 closed, 101 open Menu 15 — 16 closed, 100 open After: Menu 14 — 13 closed, 97 open Menu 15 — 13 closed, 97 open
  14. I adjusted my APS ... let’s see if it truly smooths out the on/off snatchiness of the throttle. Went quick and easy.
  15. Just here to agree with the PR5s, I've been really liking them, too. Came off of a set of Angel GTs as well on my Buell 1125CR and even though I switched bikes in the meantime, the PR5s leave nothing to be desired (yet). Hopefully they last a while, too!
×