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2021+ T9GT first service throttle sync - yay or nay?


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Noticed that the owner's manual for the Tracer 9 GT calls for throttle body sync on the first (600 mile) service.  Who has done this?

I did TB syncs on my FJ-09 every 7-8000 miles or so, but I'm not really keen on having to delve into the guts of my new bike yet.

FWIW, with my FJ-09 the first one needed minor adjustment.  Every time after that I still touched them a little, but it was because I had already torn apart half the bike just to check them; they realistically didn't need any adjustment.

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No symptoms, no need.

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6 hours ago, stevesweetz said:

Noticed that the owner's manual for the Tracer 9 GT calls for throttle body sync on the first (600 mile) service.  Who has done this?

I did TB syncs on my FJ-09 every 7-8000 miles or so, but I'm not really keen on having to delve into the guts of my new bike yet.

FWIW, with my FJ-09 the first one needed minor adjustment.  Every time after that I still touched them a little, but it was because I had already torn apart half the bike just to check them; they realistically didn't need any adjustment.

More out of curiosity (I was a Yamaha Tech-many years ago) I checked my ‘21 Tracer 9 TB sync at 600 miles. Most work is taking all the plastic & fuel tank off for the first time. I found that it was within spec but tightened it up while I was in there.

Didn’t really need to be done oh well, now I know how to do it.

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Probably about the same for the previous generation.  Dealer did my 600 mile service, not sure what was done - it only took them a couple of hours.  I was impressed with them but sadly they are 1,500 miles away.

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Semi-related and apologies for not searching on this right now, but doesn't anyone have a handy link or video to removing all the fairings on the 21+ T9GT?

The front fairings are super obvious and easy.  However, I was trying to figure out how to get the little painted panel under the seat off and could not.

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35 minutes ago, stevesweetz said:

Semi-related and apologies for not searching on this right now, but doesn't anyone have a handy link or video to removing all the fairings on the 21+ T9GT?

The front fairings are super obvious and easy.  However, I was trying to figure out how to get the little painted panel under the seat off and could not.

The owner manual lays it out, but it is a bit hard to decipher.  Those two small side panels slide out.  They are held in by a hook on the fuel tank up front, and by two or three little slots in a plastic frame just under the panel.  There may also be a push rivet in there somewhere.  You will need to first remove the rubber space-filler-upper thing which is held with a screw.  When you re-install the small panel, made sure to engage the hook on the fuel tank first.  This always gives me a hard time.

Also, with regard to the larger body panels up front, on my 21GT the rubber grommets were dry and very hard to push into.  A bit of silicone lube on the male protuberances will make it a lot easier and harder to break something.

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I will admit ignorance here, but I actually want to know the facts behind:

  1. why do the throttle bodies need to be synced at all?
  2. why do they need to be synced every 4000 miles?

In this modern day and age they cannot design a fuel system that is more robust than this? With first sync at 600 miles?!! I find it a bit absurd actually. My other bike makes no mention of this sort of adjustment at all.

Don't get me wrong ... so far I like the Tracer but things like this make me wonder ...

Regards, Grumpy Goat | 2019 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT & 2016 BMW R1200RS

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It does make you wonder.  However, I have never heard of a multi-cylinder motorcycle engine that didn't need carburetor or throttle-body synch done regularly.  Why?  IDK.  And it sure seems like something that could be eliminated.  Maybe the manufacturers are loathe to make these machines as maintenance-free as a modern car.  They understand that typical riders want to get their hands dirty on their bikes...

Like most of my other bikes, I have done the synch according to the manual's specified intervals for the first few checks.  After that, based on whether it drifts around much, I adjust the interval.  Most bikes don't need much adjustment very often.  Usually, it is something to be done alongside other maintenance that require body panel removal.  I try to do as much of this stuff as possible so as to minimize the struggles with body panels.

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3 hours ago, Grumpy Goat said:

I will admit ignorance here, but I actually want to know the facts behind:

  1. why do the throttle bodies need to be synced at all?
  2. why do they need to be synced every 4000 miles?

In this modern day and age they cannot design a fuel system that is more robust than this? With first sync at 600 miles?!! I find it a bit absurd actually. My other bike makes no mention of this sort of adjustment at all.

Don't get me wrong ... so far I like the Tracer but things like this make me wonder ...

-the TB’s are balanced during production of the TB assy by aligning the plates to each other, however some measurable variation can be detected by measuring the amount of vacuum in each cylinder when the intake valves opens and the pressure drops.

they get it close, but not perfect. 
If perfection matters to you, get it adjusted. 

-as the engine wears and carbon builds up on mating surfaces and Valve clearances change, so does the synchronization. It’s a minute change usually  

Every 4k is probably a bit overkill, but it’s what “they” decided. That’s how the Japanese roll, IMHO. 


-Skip

Edited by skipperT
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2 hours ago, skipperT said:

-as the engine wears and carbon builds up on mating surfaces and Valve clearances change, so does the synchronization. It’s a minute change usually  

And that can usually be remedied with periodic use of Yamalube Ring Free Plus. 

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***2015 Candy Red FJ-09***

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7 hours ago, Grumpy Goat said:

I will admit ignorance here, but I actually want to know the facts behind:

  1. why do the throttle bodies need to be synced at all?
  2. why do they need to be synced every 4000 miles?

In this modern day and age they cannot design a fuel system that is more robust than this? With first sync at 600 miles?!! I find it a bit absurd actually. My other bike makes no mention of this sort of adjustment at all.

Don't get me wrong ... so far I like the Tracer but things like this make me wonder ...

  1. As characteristics of the engine change, this helps keep the engine running as smoothly as possible.  The real impact if it's not done is vibration, and that's (generally) viewed as a much bigger issue on a motorcycle than a car, being almost entirely engine and your handlebars being so susceptible to it.  On a car, there's so much more non-engine mass that it's just not a big deal.
  2. The time period is really vague.  It doesn't *need* to be done at all unless you've got a problem, really - it's very unlikely to get significantly out unless you have a problem causing very uneven carbon buildup.  However, the Japanese love their maintenance.  But you'll notice the maintenance schedule has a LOT of things that don't ever really need to be done unless you have a problem.  

The Tracer isn't unique here, this applies exactly the same to every multi-cylinder motorcycle.  

 

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9 hours ago, Grumpy Goat said:

I will admit ignorance here, but I actually want to know the facts behind:

  1. why do the throttle bodies need to be synced at all?
  2. why do they need to be synced every 4000 miles?

In this modern day and age they cannot design a fuel system that is more robust than this? With first sync at 600 miles?!! I find it a bit absurd actually. My other bike makes no mention of this sort of adjustment at all.

Don't get me wrong ... so far I like the Tracer but things like this make me wonder ...

Because they probably just slap the throttle bodies on when they build it and leave the labour up to the end owner to pay for.

For what it’s worth Yamahas are normally set pretty good. Suzuki are almost always out with the air bleed screws jammed shut.

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2 hours ago, Wintersdark said:
  1. ... However, the Japanese love their maintenance.  But you'll notice the maintenance schedule has a LOT of things that don't ever really need to be done unless you have a problem.  

The Tracer isn't unique here, this applies exactly the same to every multi-cylinder motorcycle.  

Yes I did notice a lot of items on the "recommended" maintenance - overkill in my books.

Neither of the only 2 BMWs I owned require TB sync that in their manuals and they were / are 2 and 4 cylinder engines. Just valve adjustments.

Regards, Grumpy Goat | 2019 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT & 2016 BMW R1200RS

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The most important TB sync is after a valve adjustment.

A perfect sync helps smoothness and gas mileage. At hywy speed your throttle is just cracked open, this is where it's most important.

Just out yesterday. With E0 gas and 2WDW flash I averaged 53 mpg. This was back road riding.

Had this arguement on ST1300 forum many times. Sync is very important, it's not just about idle.

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