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2021+ T9GT first service throttle sync - yay or nay?


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I skipped the 600 mile check and did mine at 5k and they were off a bit. Set them correctly and never checked again. It ran fine before and after honestly.

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Just to clarify my initial comment on TB syncing ... I know why syncing of the throttle bodies would be important. What I find interesting is that this is recommended to be done so often (according to the manual) on these bikes ... even starting at the first service. Can't it hold the adjustment for any reasonable amount of time? I also thought it strange that in the other multi-cylinder fuel injected bikes I have had there was no mention of this need in the maintenance schedule ... at all. I can understand if it is in the shop manual as a solution to a specific problem. Maybe it is like someone above suggested - Yamaha tends to go overboard on service.

I got my bike pre-owned from a dealer with 2900 miles on the clock. No clue whether this sync was done at 600 miles (probably not) and it was riding fine. Now it has maybe over 7000 miles and I never had it done. Still riding fine and smooth as I would expect. Of course my other bike, for comparison, is a big boxer twin (albeit with balance shafts) so as long as it is not as throbby as that, all is good. :)

I typically get 48 mpg commuting, and have gotten as high as 60 mpg riding steady at 60-65 for about 120 miles on a tank that delivered 195 miles when I filled up just after the warning light came on. And that is with mid-grade E-10 (?) gas, and no mods to the engine.

Highway cruising at 75, single, with passenger, or loaded for motocamping - all smooth so far, as I would expect. So far so good ... no drama and it does its job. if / when that changes I will have to rethink the bike.

Thanks to all for the comments on my query on TB syncing.

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Regards, Grumpy Goat | 2019 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT & 2016 BMW R1200RS

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Posted (edited)
On 5/11/2022 at 1:02 PM, KrustyKush said:

The owner manual lays it out, but it is a bit hard to decipher.  Those two small side panels slide out.  They are held in by a hook on the fuel tank up front, and by two or three little slots in a plastic frame just under the panel.  There may also be a push rivet in there somewhere.  You will need to first remove the rubber space-filler-upper thing which is held with a screw.  When you re-install the small panel, made sure to engage the hook on the fuel tank first.  This always gives me a hard time.

Also, with regard to the larger body panels up front, on my 21GT the rubber grommets were dry and very hard to push into.  A bit of silicone lube on the male protuberances will make it a lot easier and harder to break something.

I don't see anything in the owner's manual covering panel removal, but I got what I needed from a video covering the seat slope shim install.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzTtIupYESU

 

Edited by stevesweetz
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Posted (edited)

In the shop manual where it describes the TB sync procedure, a tool is specified for turning the air bleed screws. 

Is this tool really necessary or can the screws be  turned with something else?  

 

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Edited by Skidood
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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Skidood said:

In the shop manual where it describes the TB sync procedure, a tool is specified for turning the air bleed screws. 

Is this tool really necessary or can the screws be  turned with something else?  

 

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They're just slot head screws and if you move the gas tank they're very easy to access.  I guessing the shop manual probably has you prop up the tank instead of move it, in which case it would be hard to squeeze in a normal screw driver and using an angle driver would be easier.

Whenever I did mine I just placed an old towel over the rear frame, lifted the tank without disconnecting the lines, rotated it 180° and sat it on the rear sub-frame where the rider seat would normally be so I had easy access to the whole "engine bay".  The fuel lines are near the back of the tank, so if you spin the tank around around there's enough slack in the lines to move it back that far.

Speaking from experience with my 2016 FJ-09, but should be the same on 2019 - still had the same frame and internal layout.

Edited by stevesweetz
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4 hours ago, stevesweetz said:

They're just slot head screws and if you move the gas tank they're very easy to access.  I guessing the shop manual probably has you prop up the tank instead of move it, in which case it would be hard to squeeze in a normal screw driver and using an angle driver would be easier.

Whenever I did mine I just placed an old towel over the rear frame, lifted the tank without disconnecting the lines, rotated it 180° and sat it on the rear sub-frame where the rider seat would normally be so I had easy access to the whole "engine bay".  The fuel lines are near the back of the tank, so if you spin the tank around around there's enough slack in the lines to move it back that far.

Good that you confirm that there is no need to remove the tank completely. I think I saw a video where someone did just that - rotate the connected tank..

Regards, Grumpy Goat | 2019 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT & 2016 BMW R1200RS

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I did my synchs on my FJR every 4000 because the TB's were so easy to access. Just had to prop up the tank, remove a brace and pull up the firewall and they were right there. Took about 15 minutes start to finish. I did the first synch on the '21 GT and spent over an hour and a half. I had to remove all of the plastic around the tank along with the fairings (basically every piece of plastic except the front) for the first time. Then unbolted the gas tank and spun it around onto a moving blanket out of the way. The hardest part was removing the air box  which is under the tank. There are 4 hose clamps underneath that where a bitch to access. It was only then that I could get to the throttle bodies. One needed only a slight adjustment. Then I had to put it all back together. I will probably skip the next synch. 

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4 hours ago, 2NDCHILDHOOD said:

I did my synchs on my FJR every 4000 because the TB's were so easy to access. Just had to prop up the tank, remove a brace and pull up the firewall and they were right there. Took about 15 minutes start to finish. 

Did you notice any difference after doing these syncs every 4000?

Regards, Grumpy Goat | 2019 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT & 2016 BMW R1200RS

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Posted (edited)
On 5/11/2022 at 6:53 PM, betoney said:

And that can usually be remedied with periodic use of Yamalube Ring Free Plus. 

Hey@betoney, what schedule do you follow with this fuel additive? Every tank? Once a month?

And is there a difference between bike and outboard flavors of this stuff?

Edited by nhchris
1968 Triumph Bonneville 650
1971 Norton Commando Roadster
2002 Harley 1200 Sportster
2003 Honda ST 1300
2016 FJ 09
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3 hours ago, nhchris said:

Hey@betoney, what schedule do you follow with this fuel additive? Every tank? Once a month?

And is there a difference between bike and outboard flavors of this stuff?

I don't stick to a strict schedule, basically whenever I remember to use it.  In the colder months when I don't ride quite as often, maybe once a month and in the warmer months when I'm riding all of the time or on longer road trips, probably once a week. 

The recommended dosage is 1oz to 10 gallons of fuel so I use .5oz or 15ml per tank.  I use a travel size shampoo bottle that I have marked at the proper level that I keep in my tank bag.

***2015 Candy Red FJ-09***

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15 hours ago, Grumpy Goat said:

Did you notice any difference after doing these syncs every 4000?

The adjustments were so minor and that was such a smooth running, powerful engine that I have to say no. Again it was just so easy to do that I didn't mind every 4000.

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21 hours ago, 2NDCHILDHOOD said:

The adjustments were so minor and that was such a smooth running, powerful engine that I have to say no. Again it was just so easy to do that I didn't mind every 4000.

I suspected that was the case. Thanks for confirming. 🙂

Regards, Grumpy Goat | 2019 Yamaha Tracer 900 GT & 2016 BMW R1200RS

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I did regular throttle body synch on my 2014 FJR and don’t recall needing to remove the airbox to get at the screws. The Tracer requires airbox removal. This significantly increases the work to do the job, mainly because of how hard it is to access the three 4mm clamp screws. I also am concerned about dirt getting in the TB by pulling off the airbox, also with running the motor during adjustment with the airbox removed.

I spend fair amount of time keeping dirt out of the TB, and while running the motor during adjustment I have used Covid masks to cover the intake holes just in case a fly happen by and get sucked in.  Maybe I worry too much about little, but that’s how I think.

The adjustment screws are easy to get at once the airbox is off. On the FJR I may have used an angled tool, which I have owned for years, because most engines do this work with airbox in place, if memory serves, and at my age 73 it probably does not. 

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On 5/18/2022 at 11:46 AM, KrustyKush said:

I did regular throttle body synch on my 2014 FJR and don’t recall needing to remove the airbox to get at the screws. The Tracer requires airbox removal. This significantly increases the work to do the job, mainly because of how hard it is to access the three 4mm clamp screws. I also am concerned about dirt getting in the TB by pulling off the airbox, also with running the motor during adjustment with the airbox removed.

I spend fair amount of time keeping dirt out of the TB, and while running the motor during adjustment I have used Covid masks to cover the intake holes just in case a fly happen by and get sucked in.  Maybe I worry too much about little, but that’s how I think.

The adjustment screws are easy to get at once the airbox is off. On the FJR I may have used an angled tool, which I have owned for years, because most engines do this work with airbox in place, if memory serves, and at my age 73 it probably does not. 

The airbox on the FJR was under the seat and did not have to be touched to do the throttle bodies.

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