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What did you do to your FJ-tracer-gt today?

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24 minutes ago, trevinator said:

I just leaned the bike over to check the clearance and it looks like the panniers touch down about 2-3mm before the footpegs do, while the highway pegs hit about an inch before the normal pegs. I understand that cornering forces will make them hit sooner, so i know to take it a little easy with them on the bike, but it only takes a minute or two to remove them if i want to ride like the devil. 

Maybe get some elbow sliders for the corner of the bags? 😁

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***2015 Candy Red FJ-09***

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Yesterday I had a very nice motorcycle day. I test drove three different bikes, but more about that in different threats.

What was also very nice, was that the guy responsible for importing Roadlok in Europe came to my home to see how we could fix the issue with the Roadlok not fitting on the Tracer without removing the reflector.

He had modified one of the spacers (he shortened it)and we fitted that on the bike, together with a spacer that came with the Roadlok. The thing is, if you use the standard spacers, the reflector is causing the Roadlok to become slightly misaligned. And though one might be able to tighten the bolts of the lock in such a way that the lock fits, it will be under continuous tension.

But with one of the spacer adjusted (by shortening it by 2.8mm) it fits. All in all, I'm very pleased with the service provided and with the lock.

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6 hours ago, Michiel900GT said:

What was also very nice, was that the guy responsible for importing Roadlok in Europe came to my home to see how we could fix the issue with the Roadlok not fitting on the Tracer without removing the reflector.

Wow, that is AWESOME customer support!!!


***2015 Candy Red FJ-09***

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Yes, it most certainly is. He was a cool dude and a motorcycle fanatic himself. And he was really eager to see what the issue exactly was and how to solve it.

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Slipper clutch installed, so nice to downshift now!! quiet and more easy pull.

I have a magura on the clutch lever and had a tough time adjusting engagement point, I think the best way to do that is by removing the push lever and rotating one tooth at a time. Even with that I was still either slipping on high revs or not able to fully disengage. Added a 1mm spacer on the clutch cable holder, we'll see if that's enough to get a full disengagement. 

I might go back to a regular cable as I'm pretty sure the magura is leaking from the shaft, it's a great system when it works but honestly cannot recommend it wholeheartedly. 

 

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1 hour ago, sterlinggold said:

Slipper clutch installed, so nice to downshift now!! quiet and more easy pull.

I love my slipper clutch, especially if you are riding in a sporty manner, setup for a corner and drop a gear then power through.  The lighter lever pull is nice as well.  The only way it could get better would be to add a dual direction quick shifter.

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***2015 Candy Red FJ-09***

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5 hours ago, sterlinggold said:

Slipper clutch installed, so nice to downshift now!! quiet and more easy pull.

I have a magura on the clutch lever and had a tough time adjusting engagement point, I think the best way to do that is by removing the push lever and rotating one tooth at a time. Even with that I was still either slipping on high revs or not able to fully disengage. Added a 1mm spacer on the clutch cable holder, we'll see if that's enough to get a full disengagement. 

I might go back to a regular cable as I'm pretty sure the magura is leaking from the shaft, it's a great system when it works but honestly cannot recommend it wholeheartedly.

You'll love it.  Before I decided to change mine to a slipper I was uncertain that I was going to get bang for buck in the changeover, but that doubt quickly evaporated on the first ride.

MUCH easier and smoother clutch lever pull and no more harsh changedowns with rear wheel chatter when getting a little 'eager'.

If I had been considering a hydraulic clutch sytem before I'd installed the slipper, that question would be erased at that first ride.  I've even turned my clutch lever into a shorty to match the brake lever because the pull is so easy.

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After a very, very, lengthy period of "...should I, shouldn't I..." deliberations I fitted lowering dogbones (from Cosmo-accesories.com) and lowered the forks on my 2018 GT 900.

A bit of background... I'm 5"6' with a 29' inseam (a shortarse), I could touch the ground (just) with one foot, the front part of my foot (toes to just in front of the balls of my feet) and had to lean the bike over slightly to get one foot down fully. Not too much of a huge problem whilst riding, but tough to paddle the bike in car parks or when coming to a halt on sloping ground etc. 

Then I was out on a ride, came to a T junction, stopped, put my right foot down and ..nothing... the ground wasn't where it should have been! Unluckily I'd chosed to put my foot down in the exact spot a very small pot hole was. Over went the bike tipping me onto the other side of the road. Luckily the bike only suffered a smashed rear numberplate and two minor scratches on the crash bars (thank God I fitted them a while back). What preyed on my mind was that if a vehicle had been turning into the junction I'd have been dumped right in front of it.

So I started looking on this forum and FaceBook pages for information on lowering and it was clear that of those who had lowered their bikes it was almost a 50/50 split as to whether the pros outweighed the cons, with many changing back to the standard height.

I fitted the new dogbones and lowered the forks yesterday.

Now I can get the front part of both feet onto the ground with the bike upright and the difference is FANTASTIC! 

I have not changed the sidestand, I will have to be careful that I do not park the bike on an 'upslope' but on level ground, or ground that slopes 'away' from the left side of the bike. (The sidestand length was one of the major cons people wrote about, with many having it shortened by having a chunk removed or buyng an adjustable sidestand).

I tried putting the bike on the centerstand and it is more difficullt than before but I did it with no drama, although I doubt I could do it with loaded luggage on it now. BUT I don't think I've ever used the centrestand whilst 'loaded' usually just while it's parked in the garage, so for me this isn't an issue.

In a nutshell, it has changed riding my GT drastically, I should have done it ages ago and not wasted time dithering, listening and reading about the arguments for and against. If you are like me 'coping' with your bike being 'just that tiny fraction too tall' don't just cope with it. Get it lowered, it makes a WORLD of difference. I've always loved my Tracer, now I love it even more (which I didn't think possible)

Cheers

Steve

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Grip Puppies and mirror extensions:
50184353692_2f2f32ec4b_c.jpg

New tires and valve stems tonight:
50184096236_c343c0ea1c_c.jpg

 

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On 8/1/2020 at 5:12 PM, sterlinggold said:

I might go back to a regular cable as I'm pretty sure the magura is leaking from the shaft, it's a great system when it works but honestly cannot recommend it wholeheartedly. 

I've broken a couple of clutch cables over the years, and I've also had numerous hydraulic clutch failures (mostly in cars, but once on a bike). Having experienced both, I much prefer cables. I understand the appeal of hydraulic actuation, but cables are cheap and simple. It's a $20 part that I can proactively replace every 24k miles while I have the bike apart for valve adjustment. 

The Magura system seems like too much expense and complexity for marginal gain. The slipper clutch seems like the far better way to go if you want lighter clutch feel. 

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On 8/3/2020 at 10:30 AM, keithu said:

I've broken a couple of clutch cables over the years, and I've also had numerous hydraulic clutch failures (mostly in cars, but once on a bike). Having experienced both, I much prefer cables. I understand the appeal of hydraulic actuation, but cables are cheap and simple. It's a $20 part that I can proactively replace every 24k miles while I have the bike apart for valve adjustment. 

The Magura system seems like too much expense and complexity for marginal gain. The slipper clutch seems like the far better way to go if you want lighter clutch feel. 

Yeah, hell, you can even put a spare clutch cable on your bike anywhere. Don't need the sheathing, just the inside cable itself, which coils up nice and flat and small.  I keep a universal replacement cable long enough to replace a broken clutch or throttle cable with an assortment of screw on ferrules in my toolkit all the time.  "Sadly" since carrying them, I've not needed to replace my own cables (I lube and inspect cables frequently) but I've given them to others on group rides a couple times.  At $5, it's pretty much a no brainer. 

Have a hydraulic clutch fail, and you're kinda screwed. 

 

Here: 

 

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On 8/3/2020 at 7:01 AM, kilo3 said:

Grip Puppies and mirror extensions:
50184353692_2f2f32ec4b_c.jpg

New tires and valve stems tonight:
50184096236_c343c0ea1c_c.jpg

 

I can see a domino effect due to your "fork prop" to the left into your Kawi.  Hopefully not... Poopoo   No work stands (you need front and rear to use a front when its on the centerstand)?  Nice work bench - tool chest set-up; all the same height.

I see the Little Tikes gas pump, I have one of the earlier (first?) blue ones in the back shed along with their fire engine, still in good shaper given we bought for my oldest when she was maybe 2 and now 37+ LOL

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On 8/2/2020 at 4:44 AM, bowlin01 said:

After a very, very, lengthy period

I fitted the new dogbones and lowered the forks yesterday.

Steve, what do you measure for ground clearance at the oil pan on the lowered bike?

Edited by nhchris

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Installed Heli bar riser.

Adjusted chain (1st adjustment)

Changed oil to 20 w 50 for the duration of hot weather.

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5 hours ago, nhchris said:

Steve, what do you measure for ground clearance at the oil pan on the lowered bike?

@nhchris to be honest I haven't measured it, there's plenty of room/ height for road riding (my VFR has less ground clearance).

I can measure it at the weekend if you like?

Cheers

Steve

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