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Drain plug alternative to Mazda plug


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If you've decided to replace the drain plug on your 2015 with a flush mount plug, there a an alternative (better option) to the Mazda plug. The Mazda plug has the O-ring which will eventually wear out/crack & it does seem to distort the Yamaha crush washer. Plus it takes a T45 Torx to R/R.Get a Volkswagen plug, part # N91086801. M14, 1.5 pitch, and takes an 8mm allen head, and there is no built in rubber washer.Think they're $4-5, but sent Mary to get it while I was having the CCT changed, and the guy gave it to her Gratis. :-)
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Dang, I just bought the Mazda plug and a washer.... LOL
 
Uro parts has a nice magnetic version with many washers for 11.00 and about 8.00 shipping. Not too bad for what you get, and the magnet would catch some metal particles that the filter might not get.
 
I have run filters with a few strong magnets slapped to the side of the filter can/body. works just as well, and you pull all the metal out and throw it away with every filter change, and just slap the magnets back on the next filter.
 
Easy peasy and cheap.
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Dang, I just bought the Mazda plug and a washer.... LOL 
Uro parts has a nice magnetic version with many washers for 11.00 and about 8.00 shipping. Not too bad for what you get, and the magnet would catch some metal particles that the filter might not get.
 
I have run filters with a few strong magnets slapped to the side of the filter can/body. works just as well, and you pull all the metal out and throw it away with every filter change, and just slap the magnets back on the next filter.
 
Easy peasy and cheap.
Love this idea, and I found a really cheap source for strong magnets: 
http://www.miniinthebox.com/20-pack-super-strong-rare-earth-re-magnets-8x1mm_p508685.html
 
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LOL, works great on your spin on automotive filters in your cars/trucks/farm equipment as well. :)
 
I use the rare earth magnets, and some of the best can be found at the farm supply stores. (You feed them to cattle, and it catches the barbed wire and other metal cows eat, and they then crap it out.)
 
But the magnets are very powerful, as you might expect, and smooth, so they don't scratch your bike. They are long too, so they sit along the side of the filter body very nice too. I've never had one fall off either.
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Avoid riding under chemtrails. This does as much to keep harmful metals out of your engine as magnetic drain bolts and magnets on filters. It's hard to kill a good internet myth.
 
Then you have probably never seen a ktms sump plug after a oil change... Enough metal on them that the scrap metal guy comes around to fill his truck! Can't hurt at all. My own Vw gearbox was saved when the crown wheel let go and it caught the offending tooth before it had a chance to go through the rest of the transmission.
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Here you go. Chrome plated even. :) 
http://www.qcsupply.com/140820-heavy-duty-cow-magnet.html?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=QC%20Supply%20Products(BSC)&utm_term=1100310941975&utm_content=Products%20Ad%20Group
 
I should re-brand these as "Don't have a cow man!" automotive filter magnets to save your engine. :)
Another use for a really strong magnet on the underside of your bike, is to help with you being recognized by the magnetically tripped traffic light detectors (the ones that look like a "Q" was cut into the road).  Not fun to miss traffic light changes because the detector didn't detect you.  Strong Neodymium magnets have been recommended for this.  Looking to give it a try. 
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Guest dmizer
Another use for a really strong magnet on the underside of your bike, is to help with you being recognized by the magnetically tripped traffic light detectors (the ones that look like a "Q" was cut into the road).  Not fun to miss traffic light changes because the detector didn't detect you.  Strong Neodymium magnets have been recommended for this.  Looking to give it a try.
Nope. Those traffic light triggers are not magnetic and magnets do nothing to trip them. They are inductive loops, like large metal detectors. The magnet doesn't change how much of the loop is effected in any way because the loop detects conductive material, not magnetic material. In other words, you'd have better luck tripping the light with a big hunk of copper attached to the bottom of your bike than a magnet.
 
The way to trip a traffic light is to stop right over top the rubber seal in the cutout on the pavement. The wire for the loop is under there. Stopping in the center of the cutout will mean your bike will not be detected by the loop.
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Another use for a really strong magnet on the underside of your bike, is to help with you being recognized by the magnetically tripped traffic light detectors (the ones that look like a "Q" was cut into the road).  Not fun to miss traffic light changes because the detector didn't detect you.  Strong Neodymium magnets have been recommended for this.  Looking to give it a try.
Nope. Those traffic light triggers are not magnetic and magnets do nothing to trip them. They are inductive loops, like large metal detectors. The magnet doesn't change how much of the loop is effected in any way because the loop detects conductive material, not magnetic material. In other words, you'd have better luck tripping the light with a big hunk of copper attached to the bottom of your bike than a magnet. 
The way to trip a traffic light is to stop right over top the rubber seal in the cutout on the pavement. The wire for the loop is under there. Stopping in the center of the cutout will mean your bike will not be detected by the loop.
"An induction or inductive loop is an electromagnetic communication or detection system which uses a moving magnet to induce an electric current in a nearby wire. Induction loops are used for transmission and reception of communication signals, or for detection of metal objects in metal detectors or vehicle presence indicators."
 
It is a magnetic field triggered system. The vehicles metal moving through the field triggers the detection. Car works fine, motorcycle not so much. A strong magnet can help you interact more strongly with the detector field. Another recommendation I found is installing a narrow copper hoop within the rim of the front wheel. It also helps induce a change in current triggering the detector. Might try that after seeing what a strong magnet does. Won't affect other types of traffic light detectors, but there are many of the magnetic ones around sooo...
 
If it doesn't help, I haven't lost more than the cost of the magnet (and besides it will trap all of those metal shavings :).
 
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It is a magnetic field triggered system.
 
No, it's not. It uses a magnet to create induction. The magnet is part of the device. An inductive loop's purpose is to detect metal. Your quote even says that: "for detection of metal objects in metal detectors or vehicle presence indicators."
 
Go wave a metal detector over the strongest magnet you can find. Then go wave it over a hunk of copper of roughly the same size. The copper will make a bigger signal.
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I got my plug today. It is a Dorman 65407 M14-1.50 for VW Beetle, Golf and Jetta. I think it will fit since it looks to be the same as the VW plug.  
BTW, the M14 crush washers seem to fit the plug as well.
Must be the one, fits a bunch of VW's. And yes Yamaha's OEM drain plug washer seems to be a perfect fit. BTW, I torqued down to 18 ft/lbs., seems fine. 
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Then you have probably never seen a ktms sump plug after a oil change... Enough metal on them that the scrap metal guy comes around to fill his truck! Can't hurt at all. My own Vw gearbox was saved when the crown wheel let go and it caught the offending tooth before it had a chance to go through the rest of the transmission.
My SuperDuke 990 was my track bike for its first 10,000 miles and now has north of 80,000 miles. I find stuff on magnetic drain plugs all the time but it doesn't mean it prevented damage. I'll stick with my method: chemtrails, copper bracelets, and pyramids.  

So you think the metal particles would be ok floating around in your oil? Interesting theory. You forgot about healing crystals too by the way...  (rofl)  
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