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nsmiller

FJ-09/MT-09 Tracer/FZ-09 Steering Nut and Bearing Torquing

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I'm going to note here that Yamaha has a history of not greasing areas that they can skimp on, like the axles. And are often found with corrosion by the time the tires need replacing.
I have to agree.  After 12 months of ownership, I recently pulled the swingarm and shock linkage for a visual check and re-coat with grease.  There was very little grease anywhere and the forward pivot bolt that attaches the linkage to the frame was rusted in the sleeve that rides on the needle bearings.   
Pivot_Bolt.jpg
 
 
And its just habit, but I pry off the dust seals on the wheel bearings and check the grease anytime the wheels are removed for any reason. Overkill? maybe.
 

***2015 Candy Red FJ-09***

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I'm going to note here that Yamaha has a history of not greasing areas that they can skimp on, like the axles. And are often found with corrosion by the time the tires need replacing. When doing the steering head, you might want to remove the nuts and the washer that they torque against. This washer is to be set in a bed of grease and if Yamaha skimped on the grease, moisture may leak into the bearing and over time the bearings may rust. Same reason you grease the rubber seals on the wheels. Use a waterproof grease.
 
Not just a Yamaha thing mate. They all skimp. Except for Tm dirt bikes, hand built and dripping with grease. But they have other issues like piss poor dealership support! Best off to strip all the major components early on in its life and get some grease in there. Everything will last a lot longer that way.

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Another great video, thanks for taking the time and posting.

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[quote And its just habit, but I pry off the dust seals on the wheel bearings and check the grease anytime the wheels are removed for any reason. Overkill? maybe.

 
 
Ok, thanks all for adding to my winter maintenance list! Not!
 
I shudder to think how my grease is or is not after 23,000 miles in a year, as I ride in the rain...
 
And I also pull the dust seals and grease at tire changes.
 
Anyone else have a No Mar tire changer and tire balancer like me?

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I have No Mar's cheap version Cycle Hill tire changer, and a make shift tire balancer from Harbor Freight using my own axle rods, and plastic cones from No Mar. HF's rod was slightly bent. I have done over 50 tire changes for me and friends. Technic is important if you only weigh 150 lbs. If you weigh over 200 lbs, your weight and muscle do most of the work, you don't need Technic..

Ken, Candy Ass L.D.R. Sleeps 8 hours
(2)2005 FJR1300abs:  230,000 m
2015 FJ-09:  100,920 m

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My Nomar classic is the silver hammered finish before they change to the white hammered finish which makes no sense I bought it at the Chicago Motorcycle Show few years back for like five hundred and fifty bucks including the balancer and some weights I thought it was a decent price cuz I got tired of taking the wheels off and over to a guy who did it $25 bucks a wheel so it'll take a long time to get it paid back but as like you I've done friends tires as a favor.
 
No worries for now anyway about being over 200 pounds LOL I find using enough of their changing Lube makes it a lot easier but you have to be careful otherwise you can have a tire spinning on the rim for a while which would throw off the balance don't ask me how I know

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Once you have steering head bearings in your hand you might as well upgrade to tapered rollers. Just a few more steps.

I've done it to at least 2 of my previous bikes. BIG improvement. No more headshakes, decell. hands off wobbles, smoother, etc.

If you do upgrade the torque values go out the window though. It's all done by feel and you wont need the special socket or tool.

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I have converted several bikes to tapered roller bearings but back-to-back fresh OEM type ball bearings and tapered roller bearings I feel it's running better with good old ball bearings you lose some Sensitivity I think with tapered roller bearings and I'm not alone in this opinion

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Which is offset with a much less dent prone setup. I never felt I lost sensitivity, but never replaced balls until they were dented in the straight ahead direction or rusted on dirt bikes.

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