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ninjaef

Tyre Pressure poll

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900 GT - 1 person cold temp according to Yam should be 33F/36R?
 
What pressure is in your boots and what country/state (different ambient temps!) ?
 
 
 

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Hi @ninjaef - After a bit of experimenting, I've finally settled on 32 front / 35 rear for the Michelin PR5s.   I'm about 230 pounds, always ride solo, and live in southeast Texas where the temperatures are on the warmer side. 
 

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32/36 without luggage and 36/42 when loaded for a weekend.  These are the numbers I have used for years with all bikes and tires.

I live where the air temps are 80-90 F during summer

Edited by duhg
additional yakkety-yak
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2016 FJ09 36 Front / 42 Rear per owners manual spec's. PR5 tires. Shad 35 side bags, 200lbs dripping wet. Yup.

 

Edited by 2linby

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32 front / 36 rear .... a little better ride. Although my local shop told me my tires show signs of being under inflated. So I will probably run a little higher on the Michelin Road 5s I just installed.

Edited by duhs10

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I run per manual 33 & 36, I always ride solo with panniers on but almost empty.  I weigh 180 lbs.  If I am going on a trip with loads panniers, then I go 36f & 42r.  Tire pressure close to maximum is most important when the bike is loaded to max vehicle weight because the tire pressure carries the weight.  Down to some point around 30 psi, the lower the tire pressure, the better the cornering performance.

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I run 40 and 42.  My bike is always loaded up.  I weigh 180.  I've learned from many years of experience have less than 40 psi in the front tire will result in premature scalloping of the front tire.  The extra pressure does not cause any loss of tire performance.  Great bike!

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I run 34 front, 37-38 back tire. I weigh 245 AGATT + I have a rear rack and Hebco Becker semi-soft saddlebags on the bike at all times which added a little more weight. Hoping the sport touring tires last a little longer on an 850 cc instead of the last 2 1100 Kawasaki's. Plus the weight difference, 550 lbs on the ZRX1100 and 620 on the ZX11 Ninja. If I tried my best to chill I'd get 3,000 to 3,500 on the rear and of course, the front lasts for 2 rears. Hope to get 5,000 miles or more off a rear on the FJ. Hoping a little less torque and a little less weight will make a difference.

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36f/42r on nearly all my street bikes for many years now. Have run those same pressures riding quite a bit in the UK. Ambient temps, big range as I like to go places, high 20s - 115F. Oh, and usually mixed, sport touring rear with a sport front.

A few psi cold doesn't impact most street tires to the extent some here suggest with regard to heating, wear, and contact patch. Tires are not balloons. If it's street rubber it's got constraints across all mfg with regard to heating time and designing to the lowest common denominator for the market it targets (rider skill level, road conditions, weather conditions, etc). If one really wants to find the "best" or "correct" pressure  for a given tire and conditions it's about finding the optimal operating temp. Monitor your pressure change between hot/cold, learn to read hot and cold tear indications on the tire, etc. 

With regard to track opinions above please seek out the opinion of tire techs at the venue. Many novices (we have all been there) are surprised to find that a street front sport tire often needs more pressure than suggested on the internet because at high temps the sidewalls may become quite soft and need additional pressure to maintain shape.

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