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rlambke19

How do you stay dry?

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I use Sealskinz socks for hiking @rlambke19 and they are amazing, you can get your walking boots saturated with rain and still have dry feet. They don’t breathe as well as normal socks and have a slightly “crinkly” feel about them as they have a “goretex”-like membrane inside them. I’ve only used them a few times in my motorbike boots, and only in winter, where they kept my feet toasty. They would probably be oppressive in summer.

@wordsmith, there are plenty of other brands other than Sealskinz who so the same type of sock. I just wanted to save you from using carrier bags on your feet.

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Red 2015 Tracer, UK spec (well, it was until I started messing with it...)

North-West 🇬🇧 

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2 hours ago, BBB said:

@wordsmith, there are plenty of other brands other than Sealskinz who so the same type of sock. I just wanted to save you from using carrier bags on your feet.

Thank you again - it's OK so long as I remove the groceries from the carrier-bags!


Wordsmith - a '39 model; bike - a 2019 Tracer 900 GT, Midnight Black and with many farklings.   Redland Bay, SE Queensland, Australia.

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17 hours ago, wordsmith said:

Thank you for your consideration, 3B, and your interest in my style (such as it is).   These sox seem to be a good idea, but alas I could not possibly wear them as their blue colour would clash violently with my red bike.   Otherwise, would seem worthwhile...

They come in black too. 😉

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Aerostich Darien Jacket and Pants. Goretex gloves and boots!

I'd rather ride in beautiful weather of course, but if it rains, I enjoy it! Not need to stop, just keep on going. I absolutely love riding in a downpour, totally dry and protected. My own little cocoon. 


Piedmont of NC
'15 FJ-09
'94 GTS-1000

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Goretex boots and pant liner, REVit rain shell over Motoport Kevlar mesh jacket, Knox OutDry gloves (not yet tested in a long heavy rain), and of course a silk scarf around my neck to seal the jacket collar

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I live on Vancouver Island and had a work event to attend in the Greater Vancouver area.  Decided to be frugal with my travel budget and take the bike over on the ferry instead of flying.  Sure it might rain a bit I thought, but at least I can try out my new KLIM Latitude gear.  Well holy crap did it rain.  For those of you in the US PNW, you probably had the same thing (Sept.12).  I think we set some records.  There was so much water coming at me that it did manage to find ways to creep into the gear. (lesson learned -- zip and tighten everything up) Also the leather on the forearms got completely saturated and made the inside of the arms quite damp.  But I'm willing to treat Thursday as an outlier event.  The KLIM gear is great.  Used it or a cross-BC trip this summer where temperatures ranged from 13 C to over 30 C.  You never know what you're going to get.

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Gore-tex gear is where it's at. Jacket, Pants, Boots, gloves... all of it. It's worth every penny. Gore-tex gear is breathable, keeps you dry, and I've never had any leaking issues with gore-tex, save one. My last pants (KLIM badlands pro) were gore-tex, and where the water pools at your crotch area in a deluge, it would sometimes soak through the seams in the pants; not a failure of the fabric, but of the seams. this only happened twice, both times stuck in torrential downpour for over two hours in stop and go traffic.

I've tried the other ways of protecting from water, and each has issues.

  • Water proof liners work (i rode with a kit that had liners for two years), but the outerwear gets SOAKED, and it's like riding in a trash bag when the liners are in. You're dry... but sweat stays in and soaks your undergarments, making you colder. You don't want to wear the liners all the time for the same reason - so you only put them in when it's actually raining - which sometimes meant changing into the liners on the side of the road at the first sign of rain. no bueno.
  • Drystar (as a fabric) has the benefit of no liners, but has the same garbage bag feeling. I rode with a Drystar jacket and pants for 2 monts, and it was the most miserable 2 months of my riding career.

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I moved to California and only ride during the 9 month no-rain season.  🙂  


’70 Yamaha 125 Enduro; ’75 Honda CB360T; ’81 Yamaha XS650SH; ’82 Honda GL650 Silver Wing Interstate; ’82 Suzuki GS650L; ’87 Yamaha Virago 535; ’87 Yamaha FJ1200; ’96 Honda ST1100; ’99 Yamaha V-Star Classic; ’00 Suzuki SV650; ’07 BMW K1200GT; ’12 Suzuki DR200; ’15 Yamaha FJ-09.  Bold = current

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