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pavanchavda

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I definitely agree. 2500 miles is a sweet spot for a used bike. It's almost new and I dont have to worry about hidden dealership costs and breaking in the motorcycle. :)

As for the price, I think its a very good deal. Used Tracer GTs are hard to come by in the US. The owner of bike sent me pics, vids, vin, title and everything seems good so far. Unfortunately, he is not around for a couple of weeks so I will have to wait a bit to go check it out in person. I will keep you all posted!

 

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Yeah, Tracers are really not common bikes in NA at all.  Strangely, imho, as they're really ideal bikes here.  Well suited for long distance rides and tight twisty rides.

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I was in the same dilemma a few months ago and decided on the base model. The reason being is I ride for pleasure and only do a few big trips a year so didn't think I would benefit from cruise control.  The panniers look great but as they wont hold a helmet I thought I would go for the Yamaha rack and topbox. Suspension is upgraded and there is a quick shifter on the GT but what I haven't tried I wont miss. I have also fitted oxford advanced hotgrips which were £63 as opposed to £170 for the Yamaha ones. So I am happy with my choice and don't regret buying the base model. 

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If you decide you want a quick shifter after all, I can offer a bolt-on plug'n'play shifter kit (2017+), US$150 + $15 for the postman. The '15-16 models need to add a controller, +$100 for a plug'n'play unit.


TTR Ignition Systems - Teaching Old Bikes New Tricks
Shift Sensors - Quick Shift Controllers
Coming soon: Rev Limiters - Launch Controllers - Shift Lights
North American Distributor for Shifting ContRoll     Email

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I went to test ride a Tracer last weekend. I definitely liked the bike (especially the engine!!). I liked almost everything in the bike except a couple of minor things. As other riders have reported, I definitely felt the wind on my helmet and I wasn't even going highway speed. I also found the scroll wheel on the right handlebar a bit difficult to use (I have used BMW's so I am probably comparing it against that). The temperature was about 35 F and I could still feel the cold in my fingers even with handguard, heated grips, winter gloves, and glove liners.

The 2020 color actually looks much better in person than in pictures. I hated the color in the picture but now that I looked at it in-person, I gotta say its not too bad. To anyone who wants to buy Tracer but is hesitant about the color option for 2020, I suggest that you take a look at it in person and you may change your mind.

I have been riding small displacement bikes for over 10 years and I gotta say, it was a little intimidating coming from R3 (my current bike). But I think (I hope) it's just a matter of getting comfortable with the bike. I was also very fearful of opening the throttle too much given my unfamiliarity with the bike and the engine (and probably because I had to sign a 'You drop it, you buy it' clause).

Here are some pictures of the bike from my test ride:

 

IMG_5203.jpg

IMG_5201.jpg

IMG_5202.jpg

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100% agree on the color in person. I was even going as far to get quote on painting the panels until I saw it in person.

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I *love* the 2020 panels in person.  The metallic black, the awesome red, looks great.  

Doesn't look like the photos at all imho which look wierdly orangey.

 

And yeah, the scroll wheel is finicky.  You get used to it, but it's not well design and is particularly awkward if you're wearing bulky gloves.  That said, once you settle into the bike there's not really a lot of call to actually use it much.

An upside of the Tracer if you're not accustomed to the power is the traction control can limit wheelies or prevent them entirely (tcs1 and tcs2 respectively) and the riding modes can limit the low rpm throttle.  In B mode, you need to really wind it up to high RPMs to get power, so it's pretty easy for someone not expecting the crazy low end torque the CP3 generates.  Ride in B mode initially, then move to STD once you're used to it, then up to A after.  Unlike older FJ's, A isn't jerky and twitchy.

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