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Matt 2703

2019 gt chain tension.

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I recently pick up my tracer GT from the Yamaha dealers. They serviced it prior to collection.

the issue i have is:  after checking the chain tension using the owners manual, 40mm travel on the centre stand, mine was adjusted to 65mm by the main dealers. Who is right, the owner manual or the main dealers. They have told me that 65mm - 75mm is fine. I have tried to search the correct adjustment whilst on the centre stand, but no luck.

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10 minutes ago, Matt 2703 said:

I recently pick up my tracer GT from the Yamaha dealers. They serviced it prior to collection.

the issue i have is:  after checking the chain tension using the owners manual, 40mm travel on the centre stand, mine was adjusted to 65mm by the main dealers. Who is right, the owner manual or the main dealers. They have told me that 65mm - 75mm is fine. I have tried to search the correct adjustment whilst on the centre stand, but no luck.

The dealers are right. Many people have reported damaged chains due to overtighten while there were adjusted to what the manual says.

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I have mine at 40mm on centre stand,maybe I should rethink this.

regards graham 

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I'm guessing that it's worth getting a torc wrench, then do it myself. Any suggestions? 

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The owners manual for the GT seems to be good. 35-45 mm on the centre stand. 

A torque wrench is useful for many things on the bike, but the general consensus is that the manual has it very high for the axle nut. I have been using the high value until recently but have now dropped it to 80Nm when I last did the chain adjustment. I’m sure you’ll get others chiming in with the values they use.


Red 2015 Tracer, UK spec (well, it was until I started messing with it...

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1 hour ago, Matt 2703 said:

I'm guessing that it's worth getting a torc wrench, then do it myself. Any suggestions? 

Is that “any suggestions” for where to get a torque wrench from?

I have the previous model of this from Halfords. It has a lifetime guarantee and comes with a calibration certificate. Inaccurate torque wrenches are not much use really.

Halfords-Advanced-Torque-Wrench-Model-30

Shop the latest The Halfords Advanced Torque Wrench Model 300 is for...

 


Red 2015 Tracer, UK spec (well, it was until I started messing with it...

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Remember that an over tight chain will damage the transmission output shaft bearing, which is a very expensive to replace. Most people will tell you that most manufactures recommended chain tension is too tight. I always run my chain on the loose side, I will live with a little more noise from the chain.

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6 hours ago, Matt 2703 said:

I recently pick up my tracer GT from the Yamaha dealers. They serviced it prior to collection.

the issue i have is:  after checking the chain tension using the owners manual, 40mm travel on the centre stand, mine was adjusted to 65mm by the main dealers. Who is right, the owner manual or the main dealers. They have told me that 65mm - 75mm is fine. I have tried to search the correct adjustment whilst on the centre stand, but no luck.

On the original FJ09, our owners manual stated 5-15mm slack😲 obviously WAAAY too tight.  Since 2015 it has been widely accepted that 30-35mm is a much safer amount of slack.

The newer Tracer has a slightly longer swingarm but I'm not certain that the slack should be that much different, 65-75mm seems like alot.

Concerning a torque wrench, do what you feel comfortable with but I never use a torque wrench on the axle nut.  If you read through the service manual, there is a torque value for every fastener on the bike -In my opinion- that's overkill.

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***2015 Candy Red FJ-09***

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I noticed this also shortly after i picked my new Tracer GT up. The chain was VERY loose like 65mm of travel. The dealer i bought my Tracer from was a multi-line dealer that also sold dirt bikes. I assumed whoever set that bike up got mixed up with a dirt bike chain spec. I consulted the owners manual that gave a spec of 35-45mm so i adjusted it to 40mm.

This has been an issue for a few years with chain tension on other Yamaha models like my XSR900 and former FJ-09. Those manuals state 5-15mm  which to me is unrealistic and far to tight so i always went around 30mm on those bikes.

I figured on the Tracer GT since the manual gave a realistic spec of 35-45mm that it was believable for that bike. Like betoney said 65-75mm seems like alot of slack. 

 

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2019 Tracer 900 GT. 2019 Yamaha XSR 900. 2002 Buell S3T Thunderbolt. 2016 FJ-09 SOLD.

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Posted (edited)

It seems logical to me that street bike chain tension should be relatively similar across bike models and brands.

I mean why not?  A chain is a chain is a chain. Running between a primary cog and rear gear ring on a Yamaha, Duc, Kawai or Honda really makes no difference to the chain itself right?

WRT FJs: An MC Garage video on the Motorcyclist Mag website dealt specifically with the 5-15 Yamaha chain spec. In it Ari Hemming said that was waaaay too tight for any chain and could potentially cause damage.  In his experience around 40 was what it should be regardless of what Yamaha specd.

Set the tighter spec on the center stand there is no slack with compressed rear suspension. This can't be good.

Remember, this is the same company that wants spark plugs checked or replaced every 4k mile and brake lines replaced at 8K.  Both of which seem like a Dealer's dream for make work.

Edited by nhchris

1968 Triumph Bonneville 650
1971 Norton Commando Roadster
2002 Harley 1200 Sportster
2003 Honda ST 1300
2016 FJ 09

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@nhchris chain tension is based on swing arm length and suspension travel. That is why a long travel bike (dirt bike) will always have a looser chain than a street bike. Arie is right,  a too tight chain will cause damage. If you see your chain cutting into the chain slider on top of the swing arm it is sign it's loose.

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I had the opposite problem after my 10k (kms) service. Chain was like a piano wire! = not happy..

Chain tension across bikes and models is driven (no pun intended!) by the relationship between the sprocket centres and swingarm pivot position. Least slack  being achieved when they all in line in the suspension stroke. Just my 2c.

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Posted (edited)

The manual for the GT warns that "if the drive chain slack is more than 50 mm (on the centre stand), it can damage the frame, swing arm and other parts"

 

Edited by Pupsi
to clarify better
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On 5/11/2020 at 6:00 PM, nhchris said:

It seems logical to me that street bike chain tension should be relatively similar across bike models and brands.

I mean why not?  A chain is a chain is a chain. Running between a primary cog and rear gear ring on a Yamaha, Duc, Kawai or Honda really makes no difference to the chain itself right?

WRT FJs: An MC Garage video on the Motorcyclist Mag website dealt specifically with the 5-15 Yamaha chain spec. In it Ari Hemming said that was waaaay too tight for any chain and could potentially cause damage.  In his experience around 40 was what it should be regardless of what Yamaha specd.

Set the tighter spec on the center stand there is no slack with compressed rear suspension. This can't be good.

Remember, this is the same company that wants spark plugs checked or replaced every 4k mile and brake lines replaced at 8K.  Both of which seem like a Dealer's dream for make work.

Not sure if your service schedule is different but my book says spark plugs every 8k (excessive) and brake lines every 4 years. 

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