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captainscarlet

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captainscarlet last won the day on June 27

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About captainscarlet

  • Birthday 01/21/1972

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  1. For ECU flash I would have to recommend S-TEC Performance in Newbury. Simon at S-TEC has specialised in tuning our CP3 engines and the results are fantastic. https://www.facebook.com/STecPerformance/ He offers a mail-in or ride-in service and also has a dyno if you want a bike specific tune. I recently had my Tracer flashed whilst on a trip to the UK and the results are fantastic. The bike is now so smooth with power everywhere. It's the bike Yamaha intended it to be before the envirocrats got their hands on it. Simon is really knowledgeable and humble with fantastic attention to detail. He noticed and adjusted little things like my clutch and throttle cable as part of the service. I can't recommend him enough. CS
  2. I'm terribly sorry old chap but here in the old world we don't know what that is. 😋
  3. After my recent marathon trip to the UK I noticed that the lower cross member on my centre stand hand been "sand blasted" to the extent that it was down to bare metal. I took the opportunity this weekend to remove the stand and repaint it. I did a really thorough job including sanding, priming and putting down several layers of semi-matte black top coat. Having ridden to work today the bloody thing is stone chipped already. I'm thinking about wrapping the cross member in some sort of protective black wrap and was wondering if the panel had any input on the matter? Of course I may well be being far too anal and worrying about something as utilitarian as a centre stand. CS
  4. For the exhaust I and a number of others on this board have fitted a Scorpion slip-on. Lovely piece of kit. It is homologated so will pass an MOT and delivers a lovely throaty sound. Scorpion also do a full system if you prefer. You can read about mine and others installs here: For ECU flash I would have to recommend S-TEC Performance in Newbury. Simon at S-TEC has specialised in tuning our CP3 engines and the results are fantastic. https://www.facebook.com/STecPerformance/ He offers a mail-in or ride-in service and also has a dyno if you want a bike specific tune. I recently had my Tracer flashed whilst on a trip to the UK and the results are fantastic. The bike is now so smooth with power everywhere. It's the bike Yamaha intended it to be before the envirocrats got their hands on it. Simon is really knowledgeable and humble with fantastic attention to detail. He noticed and adjusted little things like my clutch and throttle cable as part of the service. I can't recommend him enough. CS
  5. The blurple wheels are fantastic. I love mine and they are so much nicer to look at than boring old black or gold. Plus they are at least 20 km/h faster everywhere.... CS
  6. Before doing anything else you want to set the rider sag. This means adjusting the preload at the front and back so that approximately 30% of the available suspension travel is used up with you sitting on the bike in your normal riding gear. On the GT this means roughly 41 mm of travel front and back. What you do is lift the front of the bike so the wheel is off the ground and measure the exposed tube at the bottom of the fork leg. Then get on the bike, feet on the pegs and steadying yourself against a wall or similar get a nearby assistant to take the same measurement. The difference between the unloaded and loaded measurement is your rider sag and as mentioned you're looking for around 41 mm. Do the same at the rear. Put the bike on the centre stand and from the axle measure to a fixed point on the bodywork directly above the rear axle. Get on the bike again and ask your assistant to take the same measurement again. If you have less than 41 mm then you need to reduce preload, which in turn means that if you have more than 41 mm rider sag you need to add preload. Once you've got your preload dialed in you can start fiddling with rebound. Here you are looking for the suspension to quickly and smoothly, without bouncing up and down, return to it's rest position having been compressed. You can test this in the garage by pushing firmly down and then releasing the handlebars to compress the front forks. At the rear simply push down firmly on the rear seat and release. I made 3 videos to demonstrate what you're looking for in terms of rebound, which you can find here: Once you've got rebound dialed in in the garage you can fine tune it on some of your favourite roads. CS
  7. Seems like you're also pretty interested in how your fuel consumption is doing. 😋 CS
  8. Too be honest I've never really cared about fuel consumption on my bikes. They're essentially toys. As long as I have a rough idea of how far I can go on a full tank that's all I need to know. I never trust in-vehicle fuel consumption gauges. The only way to properly measure consumption is to fill the tank, ride until almost empty, fill the tank again and check based on distance travelled against fuel put in. This I do with my car, but never on the bike. CS
  9. IMHO no additional hardware is needed. The "problem" is due to poorly adjusted suspension and the rider holding on too tight. I have seen many claim on this board that they are not holding on too tight, but I would have to disagree. It is simply a definition of what too tight is. I recently completed a trip to the UK from Sweden via Denmark, Germany and Holland. Those nice Germans have provided kilometre after kilometre of high speed test track in the form of Autobahns. I took the opportunity to experiment at speeds up to and exceeding 200 km/h, that's 125 mph in old money. I could at will order up a smooth wobble free ride or a wobble depending on how I held onto the bars. For info I had Yamaha's semi-rigid Euro panniers fitted and a Givi 40 litre topbox. The trick to a wobble free ride is to grip the right bar sufficiently to hold the throttle in position, but no more. Your left hand should have en extremely light grip on the bar. Your fingers are simply wrapped around the bar but not really gripping it. Your upper body is held in position by your stomach/abdomenal muscles and NOT your arms. At higher speeds there is turbulence on our bikes. Whether we realise it or not this turbulence on our arms and upper body is constantly providing small steering inputs to the bars. It is these that induce the wobble. I'm willing to bet that most people experiencing a wobble are holding themselves in position on their bikes with their arms and not their upper body. The arms being battered by the wind make small steering inputs and create a wobble. CS
  10. Haha! I don't change my pants....sorry bike as frequently as you, although so far it has been about once every two years on average. The Tracer is the bike I've kept the longest at 4.5 years. However I have this nagging itch to change to a KTM. I'm also with you on the tinkering side of things. It's the only upside of the long Swedish winter; plenty of time for fiddling. CS
  11. Congratulations. Although I must confess I feel like Ripley waking up after 57 years drifting through the core systems. Didn't you just buy a brand new 2015 red Tracer? What have I missed? CS
  12. You won't blow the fuse. I've just completed a 6000km trip to the UK. I had my phone plugged into a USB adapter in the 12v socket on the left of the dash. On the right I had installed a double USB socket in the empty space which had my iPhone 6 Plus plugged in on navigation duty. Both the right and left sockets we're rated at 2.1 plus amps. With the standard 2 amp fuses in the fusebox I never had a problem, even with the chargers going several hours each day. Plug in, ride and relax. CS
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