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keithu

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Everything posted by keithu

  1. That makes sense and I expect it would be the same with any auto-oiling system since temperature affects the oil's viscosity.
  2. I had a Lubeman on my TT600 and I found it responded poorly to elevation changes. When I rode up into the mountains (I can go from 100 to 4800 feet without leaving my county) pressure changes would cause the Lubeman to quickly pump it's entire reservoir onto the chain and rear tire. After the second or third time it tried to kill me I threw it in the trash.
  3. If it were my money I'd probably get the 2015. $6990 is a great deal on a new bike, but the cruise control, ECU remap, and heated grips are highly valuable mods. Valves should be fine at 10k miles, they aren't due for inspection until 24k. Insurance seems to vary widely by location, individual, and company, but it should be cheaper than a typical sportbike. You can always get a quote before you buy.
  4. Nice list! We definitely need a photo of the DB2.
  5. I know where that is! I found an old photo of you with Becky and Butch in the archives. I believe this was the 2003 Oregon 250. Sorry, it's pretty low res.
  6. keithu

    FJR-09

    Officially it has been postponed to September (was July). The event is still at risk, we'll see what happens.
  7. keithu

    FJR-09

    Oh, and I upgraded my cupholder arrangement. Hopefully this is a little more solid.
  8. keithu

    FJR-09

    I installed a Scott Oiler V-system today. Kind of a pain. I also installed a couple of Z brackets as suggested by @2and3cylinders to further reinforce the windshield support. I didn't really understand the concept at first, but the more I looked at the support assembly the more it made sense to me. After bolting everything together it is obvious from pushing on the windshield that the whole front end is a lot more stout.
  9. I installed a Scott Oiler V-system today. What a pain! I think this actually took longer than the MCCRUISE install, mostly because I spent a lot of time agonizing over where to put the reservoir. I ultimately attached it to the left luggage rail. Out in the open and not pretty, but let's be real: "pretty" went straight out the window when I installed a big ass fuel cell on my FJ.
  10. My BMW K100RS was the same way. It was fuel injected but had a "choke" lever that truly was necessary to get it started in the morning. I think it was actually a manual idle advance rather than a true choke.
  11. Welcome! Lovely bike in your avatar.
  12. He had just been pulled over for a minor speeding violation. What he didn't yet know, when I snapped this photo, was that a clerical error caused a "failure to appear" warrant to be issued for him in Nevada. Once at the jail he was able to prove that the warrant was erroneous, and he was back on his way after only about a two hour delay.
  13. That's almost the History of Sportbikes right there. What didn't you like about the '93? Obviously we've all read that they were overweight, but this sort of thing is always more important in magazine comparos than in the real world. A friend of mine racked up serious miles on a Katana 1100, well over 100k I think. Here is Tom being arrested on his Katana in 1997. The officer kindly allowed Tom to ride his bike to the jail so it wouldn't be impounded.
  14. You're making me jealous. I'm stuck working all week so I can look out my window at this beautiful weather, or even step outside once in a while. Looks like the rain comes back on Saturday, just in time for the weekend. 🤬
  15. That same basic motor lived on for another 30+ years in the GS500. Wikipedia says they still produce it for Latin America.
  16. A friend of mine owned a motorcycle salvage yard in Eugene. He said the PC800 was the one bike that almost never came through the salvage system. They don't die on their own, and the people who buy them don't tend to wreck them.
  17. Coolest bike of the thread thus far.
  18. People criticized Honda because by their own admission the Pacific Coast was designed to attract non-motorcyclists into the showrooms. Well why not? Who do you think the "You meet the nicest people on a Honda" campaign was aimed at? One of the most practical motorcycles ever made, too bad more people didn't buy it.
  19. Probably the same Yamaha engineer who thought it was fine that on a half-faired bike like the FJ-09 you have to remove seven fairing panels with six different kinds of fasteners in order to remove the fuel tank.
  20. I had a VMax loaner for about a week. I rode it from the SF Bay Area up to my Dad's near Reno, following a ~300 route through the Sierras. This was in 1996 so I'm afraid I don't remember much about the brakes, handling, etc. The main things that stick in my mind are the epic motor and the bordering-on-criminal fuel filler design. The fuel filler is under the mid-seat pad, as shown in the photo below. If you have any luggage bungeed on the pillion seat, like I did, first remove all of it because it will be in the way. The pad flips forward just enough to barely reveal the filler. To open the pad, you have to use both hands and open the release latches located on BOTH SIDES of the seat. Why two latches?! One would suffice, but no. You must open both spring-loaded latches simultaneously. May the odds be ever in your favor. Now with the pad open, use the ignition key to unlock the cap, located deep down in the bowels of the motorcycle. Better remove your gloves first, it's a tight squeeze. Once the cap is removed, insert the fuel filler nozzle and begin fueling. I see you live in California, so you're going to have an epic fight with the CA anti-evap nozzle foreskin. There isn't enough room for it and you will definitely spill fuel everywhere. No way around it. This probably isn't a big deal in other states, but in California via con Dios. When you're done, clean up most of the spilled fuel, re-install the fuel cap, close the seat pad, and re-bungee all your luggage on the pillion seat. Repeat 90-100 miles later because the mighty VMax is thirsty and carries less than four gallons of fuel.
  21. What's your honest opinion about the VMax? I had one for about a week as a test bike. The motor was outstanding, but I'm pretty sure the fuel filler was designed by the same engineer who did the FJ-09 bodywork.
  22. The Ninja 500/EX500 was a decent starter bike. I think they went almost 20 years without significant mechanical changes. I actually thought they looked nice, although some of Kawasaki's paint schemes were hideous.
  23. Gah! I just rode by one earlier today on an errand but didn't get a pic.
  24. The CB400T was a fantastic first bike. I rode the piss out of mine. I was always a fan of the mid-90s GPZ1100. They come up cheap on Craigslist once in a while, nobody seems to know what they are. Someday I'd like to pick one up as a project.
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