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Gregorius T

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About Gregorius T

  • Birthday 07/01/1966

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  • Location
    Bend, OR
  • Bike
    2015 Fudge 9

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  • website_url
    gregoriust.com

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  1. It makes sense that you either have to deal with "fling off", or "grit attraction". If the substance doesn't fling, then it must be sticky. If it's sticky, then grit sticks to it, also. If it's not so sticky, it flings off. This seems to be a basic constraint of physics. You can't have your cake, and eat it too, in this case. At least, not all of the cake. You can attempt to find a substance that exhibits the properties of stickiness and anti-fling, but you won't find a substance that's best at both.
  2. Is that a pair of pockadoted boxers, I see in the laundry basket? Heh heh 😀
  3. I often will apply a bit of grease to each spacer, to keep them stuck in place, while pushing the axle back in. The trickiest part for me is getting the brake calipers slotted back in place. One trick I do is to sit directly in front ( for front wheel install ) or in back ( for rear wheel install ), and jam my foot under the wheel. I use my foot to jiggy the wheel up, and in place. I then have both hands free, to muck with the brake calipers, and push the axle in place. I've never bothered removing the ABS sensors. Those sensors are actually pretty damn tough, and as long as you're not a clumsy fingers, and banging the wheel around, the sensors should be fine. If you think about it, those sensors operate in a pretty harsh environment. Pebbles, road grit, bugs, and all manner of debris smacks into them. That's just me, though. I've removed my wheels several times now, and my sensors are just fine. Make sure you loosen that front pinch bolt, before attempting to loosen the front axle. I forgot to do that one time, and ended up bearing down fairly hard, to loosen the front axle, before realizing my mistake. Fortunately, I didn't damage anything.
  4. I had my cam chain tensioner replaced, due to it making noise. Yamaha covered the cost of that. I also swapped out my clutch cable, for the updated version. As for miliage, 17K is not much. There is a dude on this site, pushing 150K miles on his Fudge 9, I believe. I wrote the words below, on a similar post: I've had my 2015 FJ-09 for almost 4 years. I've got 35K on the odo, and plan to tack on buttloads more. I absolutely love this bike! I'm 6'3", 195 lbs. It fits me perfect. It's a bit of a tall bike. Be sure to sit on it, and test ride, if you can. Keep in mind, the seat has both a low, and high, setting.It has more than enough power for me. Actually, probably more than I need, most of the time. It is wickedly fun on the twisty backroads. I often ride in standard mode, but when I get into the twisties, I flip it over to A mode. Wooo hoooo. A slight twitch of the throttle, and that bike is shooting out of the corners. So fricken fun! I've done quite a bit of customization. Renthal handlebars, re-programmed ECU, custom seat, new windscreen, and so forth. I also rebuilt the front suspension, and installed a Penske rear shock. The stock suspension is ok, but if you're going to really get crazy in the twisties, you're gonna want to upgrade the suspension. I often will do 500-mile days, easy. This bike has never failed me. It's reliability has been great. As for the brakes, I've had no problem with them. Some say that the brakes are too small, for a bike pushing 500 lbs. Like I said, I've never had a problem, and I don't plan to upgrade the brakes. They work just fine, for me.I LOVE my Fudge 9!!! Heh heh. Cheers.
  5. I've had my 2015 FJ-09 for almost 4 years. I've got 35K on the odo, and plan to tack on buttloads more. I absolutely love this bike! I'm 6'3", 195 lbs. It fits me perfect. It's a bit of a tall bike. Be sure to sit on it, and test ride, if you can. Keep in mind, the seat has both a low, and high, setting. It has more than enough power for me. Actually, probably more than I need, most of the time. It is wickedly fun on the twisty backroads. I often ride in standard mode, but when I get into the twisties, I flip it over to A mode. Wooo hoooo. A slight twitch of the throttle, and that bike is shooting out of the corners. So fricken fun! I've done quite a bit of customization. Renthal handlebars, re-programmed ECU, custom seat, new windscreen, and so forth. I also rebuilt the front suspension, and installed a Penske rear shock. The stock suspension is ok, but if you're going to really get crazy in the twisties, you're gonna want to upgrade the suspension. I often will do 500-mile days, easy. This bike has never failed me. It's reliability has been great. As for the brakes, I've had no problem with them. Some say that the brakes are too small, for a bike pushing 500 lbs. Like I said, I've never had a problem, and I don't plan to upgrade the brakes. They work just fine, for me. I LOVE my Fudge 9!!! Heh heh. Cheers.
  6. Right smack dab in the middle of Oregon. Bend, Oregon, to be exact. There is so much damn good riding here! Twisty backroads in all directions, that go for miles and miles. And, not many cars at all. I almost feel guilty to have so much good riding available, when other poor bastards don't have jack. I've got superb twisty backroads 5 minutes from my house. This is Tracer country, through and through. Cheers.
  7. I finally did it! After hitting almost 35K on the odo, I removed my swingarm, and took a looksy at the linkage bolt, and bearings. Since I don't ride hardly at all in the rain, or any other muck, my linkage and bearings looked like new. Removing the swingarm is pretty easy. After removing the rear wheel, of course, you need only follow the below couple of steps: 1. Remove the shock linkage bolt. That's the one you get to, via the little hole on the right side of the swingarm. 2. Remove the main swingarm bolt. This is the big ass rod and nut, that connects the swingarm to the rest of the bike. The nut is big, but mine came off fairly easily. The swingarm is fairly light, so you should be able to pretty easily drop the swingarm away from the bike. Some people will also remove the front sprocket cover, and slip the chain off the front sprocket, so's they can transport the swingarm onto a work bench, or something. This is not necessary unless you want to, of course, carry the swingarm away from the bike. Once the swingarm has been dropped, you can then slip the outer bearing dust covers off. There are four of them, and they come off fairly easily. Also, you can slide out the inner bearing sleeves. You will then see the ridged bearings. At this point, I cleaned up the swingarm using some warm water, to get the dirt off. And then, a bit of kerosene, to wipe away the gunked grease and oil. I stayed clear of the bearings, when cleaning with the kerosene, and simply wiped the old grease from the bearings using a clean rag. Once you have the swingarm, and bearings, all cleaned up, I wiped clean the inner sleeves, and applied a good coating of grease to them. I also wiped clean the rod, and coated it with grease. Also, I did the same to the inner part of the outer dust covers. I removed the inner rubber parts of the dust covers, wiped them clean, and applied a bit of grease. When reinserting the rubber parts, ensure you insert them properly, with the chamfered edges pointing in. Once satisfied with the cleaning, and greasing, I put the bike back together. It went back together fairly easily. Similar to mounting the rear wheel, you just slip the swingarm in position, and push the big ass rod through. You want to be careful that the dust covers stay in place. Also, under the head of the rod, on the left side of the bike, is a funky washer, that sits in the flat-edged slot. You want to ensure that washer stays in place. My Haynes manual specified a torque of 110 nm, which, as with many of the torque values, seems way overkill. I torqued to 85, or 90, and called it good. I can now rest easy, knowing a very important part of my bike's suspension linkage is clean, lubed, and in great shape. I hope this post helps ya all, and remember ... Ride HARD! Ride GOOD! Ride like you F'n SHOULD! Cheers. 😀 🤟
  8. As usual, FortNine makes a great video. Coincidentally, I was just wondering about this topic. I was thinking exactly what FortNine pointed out. A chain has internal lube, and the contact with the sprockets is on the rollers. What the hell good does chain lube do, then? FortNine says that a lube will seep into the chain internals, and help reinforce the internal lube, which makes sense. Also, chain lube helps prevent rust, which also makes sense. I've been using chain wax, which, not surprising, seems to attract grit. Looks like I'll be switching to gear oil. 🤟
  9. Hey There, my fellow Fudge 9 owners! I just posted a new ride report. I'm calling it "Wild and Woolly Ride 2018". https://gregoriust.com/2018/09/20/wild-and-woolly-ride-2018-one-for-books/ If you're thinking of riding through Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming, you might want to take a read on this report. It includes a bit of information on the famous Beartooth Pass, in Montana. There is also a link to an instagram video of the riding through Beartooth. Cheers G
  10. Thanks Chris. I fully agree with your statement. I'm 52, and have only been riding street for 3 years. It's been a very busy three years ( over 30K miles on the odo ), and I've learned a tremendous amount. One of the most important things I've learned is, the capability of my bike far exceeds my riding skills. My skills are steadily improving, but I'm not even close to the point where a bike that is faster, and more powerful, than my FJ is needed. And, certainly wouldn't be fully utilized. I've had a couple pucker moments, where I've run wide on a corner. I knew that if I'd had the skill to lean the bike over further, and trace a line through the corner, I would not have run wide. Also, I've had a couple incidences, where I needed to bear down hard on the brakes. In each case, I was able to stop, with room to spare, and go on unscathed, with only a change of underwear needed. In the case of this recent 7-day ride, when I rounded the corner and spotted the tree on the road, I executed a perfect stop, fully relying on the bike's braking system to save the day. Sure enough, it did. As well as, for the three riders behind me. We all just motored on, and finished up a great day of riding. Yup. If someone tells me "I had to lay er down!", I'm going to have a raised eyebrow. G
  11. Thanks dedsxy47 I deleted the post, because people were getting butt hurt over the "lay er down" joke part. I did really want to initiate some discussion on this, as we did encounter a dead tree over the road, and the brakes worked very well! I do hear riders sometimes say "I had to lay er down.". I can't imagine ever abandoning your machine. Maybe, I suppose, if you were headed towards the ass end of a semi trailer, and figured going under it was a viable option. Even then, my reflex is to always rely on my machine to take me out of harms way. Usually, emergency brake, and steer into the clear.
  12. Hear me now and hear me later, my good fudgie friends! I will be blogging my upcoming epic ride through Montana and Wyoming. 7 days, 2,500 miles. This I must tell you, there will be three riders, and two of those riders will be on Fudge 9s. How's that for some fudgie sheet, eh? https://gregoriust.com/2018/09/05/lets-git-wild-and-woolly-in-wyoming/
  13. Hey there, my fellow fudge riding buddies! I've posted a new article on my blog. It's on a topic I think we can all relate to, eh? I hope you enjoy my words. Cheers. https://gregoriust.com/2018/08/28/the-passion-of-the-motorcycle/
  14. Hey patkin I would love to experience some Ohio riding goodness. I will certainly get ahold of you, if I make it that far east. Hey man. I was just going by what I see in Cyclecruza's videos, on YouTube. Ha. Cheers, mate
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