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bttrthnwrk

Tucson to San Antonio and back in August

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Looks like I might be riding from Tucson to San Antonio maybe in the first week or three of August. I'll may be coming down 285 from New Mexico through Pecos and Fort Stockton. Then onto 90 through Del Rio and on into San Antonio.
 
I hadn't planned on swinging down to Texas' Big Bend National Park, but there's no particular reason I can't, as long is it's mostly free of rain, floods, hail, drought, and twisters in August. I've never been there, so I don't know. But I seem to remember stories about the Big Bend country that lean heavily on the unfriendliness of the weather there. I'll have to start dropping south out of New Mexico further to the west if I'm going to visit the Big Bend, though.
 
Once I'm through in San Antonio, I'll be heading north on 281 to 71 to 87 and on through San Angelo and Big Spring, then on 137 to US-380. I'll even get to stop in Roswell on my way back across New Mexico. Then on to Tucson and home.
 
Anyway, any recommendations for sightseeing or notable twisties along or near those routes?
 
Thanks.

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I can only offer limited advice since I rode through the area once.  NM was one of my favorite states for riding, though.
 
I really liked White Sands.  They rent sleds at the visitors center and you can sled down the sand dunes.  Very fun.  Good photo ops of the bike on the sand roads, too.  When we went from White Sands to Roswell, I think we took 82 instead of 78.  It was twistier, but it was too much traffic to enjoy.  Roswell was cute - worth the trip to the tiny museum, IMO.
 
If you have time, swing a little north to the Gila Forest around Silver City, NM.  Really some of my favorite riding in the country.  15, 35, 152
 
I'd bring a Camelbak or plan on making a lot of stops for hydration in August.  We did it in July.  It is awkward snaking the water tube up under a tight, full face helmet, but worth the hassle.
 

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I'd planned on taking my Camelbak. The nozzle fits pretty well under my Shoei modular.
 
The only route I've been on in NM so far is US-180 and then back to US-191 on SR-78. Round trip circles from Show Low and/or Springerville for several rides.
 
Thanks for the suggestions.

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I live in SA and ride Big Bend and New Mexico several times a year. Gotta tell ya, this time of year until September it gets pretty hot in that area, anyplace south of Carlsbad is hot. Beware of fracking traffic between Carlsbad and Fort Stockton...........was riding out there just a month ago ( I rode to the Badlands, on the way up I took this route on the way back came down the Texas Panhandle) and there's speeding 18 wheelers all over and due to this traffic watch the road closely for pot holes. Being from Tucson I'm sure you know how to deal with the heat just be prepared. I would ride from sunrise till about 2. If you decide to do Big Bend from Pecos go to Balmorhea State Park, one of the best swimming holes in Texas, good camping or nice lodge. From Balmorhea head to Fort Davis, the fort is restored and a very good example of life in the 1800's. Twelve miles out of Fort Davis is the McDonald Observatory, third largest telescope in continental USA its operated/maintained by Texas University, nice gift shop with cool stuff. From there ride to Marfa (artsie/fartsie little town) and then to Persidio (hottest town in Texas). At Persidio catch River Road, nice road with twisties (one of the best biker roads in Texas) and follow the Rio Grand for many miles and end up in Study Butte which is close to the western entrance to Big Bend. From Big Bend get on 90 and stop in Langtry and check Judge Roy Beam's museum, some cool history there. Down the road from there is Seminole Canyon State Park (close to Comstock, Tx), nice place to camp in the desert but nice. What makes the park so nice is the Native American drawings that go back several thousand years, to actually see the drawings you must do a guided tour but the park headquarters has some good stuff to check out. Once you get about 75 miles east of Del Rio you can hang a left and head to the Texas Hill Country. Have a blast but be sure to be the heat.

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Thanks. That'll help a bunch with route and time planning for the Texas part of the trip.
 
I tend to follow a similar routine when riding in the summer around Tucson. It works okay, especially with gear adapted to the heat, but it can really throw me off if I'm somewhere in June that doesn't act like Tucson. The last couple trips I took in June were through Durango, Silverton and points north (and points UPWARDS, too) in Colorado. It really threw me off to get up at 5AM while I was there and NOT have the June temp in the 80's or 90's already. In Silverton, I had to keep my coat on the entire time I was walking around and exploring the town. Weird.

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