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For a beginner?


gwatkins6
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Welcome.
 
Man, if you are totally new, unless you live in a big city, I would get a Dual sport bike or just a used dirtbike and go ride dirt roads and ATV trails. That is how I start new riders in Idaho. Dirt riding teaches you so many damn balance points and skills. Teaches you great brake control, and then before you know it you are pulling wheelies and power slides.
Plus, after you get a street bike, you will miss riding dirt. A great first bike is a used DRZ-400 because they are plentiful, and they last forever.
 
If city bound, go take a really good riding safety course and then get a an old beater bike because you will drop it alot. Again, the DRZ-400 is oerfect for this with street tires, its a fun Super moto and easy to learn on. Drop it, crash it, whateva. Pick it up, loosen and straighten the forks and take off riding again most of the time.
 
I would not suggest a new rider starting off on this bike with this triple engine. No way, man. and don't let anyone else tell you differently.
 
We want you to live, come back someday and share pictures of your FJ-09 when you get it!
 
 
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Thanks Cruizin, I live in Chula Vista a suburb of San Diego. I am getting this bike for fun because I want one. I have ridden bikes before, years ago so that is why I consider myself a beginner. I have no desire for wheelies of power slides. Just ride a on the weekends for fun. I am 6'3 260 and don't want to lean, that's why I like the upright bike. I was going to buy the versys 650 but saw the FJ09 on sale for $9500 near me. The 650 versys was $8700. Does that change your opinion at all?
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1.Still take a riding course, please. No matter which bike you choose. Alot of ex riders who come back to bikes end up dead in the river up here in Idaho on the mountain roads. The road turns, they don't, end of story.
 
2.This is the FJ-09 forums. We get this question every day almost and the answer is always the same. Get an FJ-09 and don't look back. Go to the Versys forums and they will say something similar.
 
Honestly, we don't know you and have never ridden with you. We really have no way of picking the right bike for you. But, the FJ-09 will run circles around the Versys, even the Versys 1000.
If you just want to ride on streets, get an FJ-09. If you wanna ride dirt roads too, don't get an FJ-09.
 
 
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You are plenty tall to ride this bike. It is very comfortable, so you won't have to get use to hunching over. B mode will be used by you for 1 month, then you will stay in A mode I would reckon. Take an MSF course to get back in the swing of things. Leaning is part of the fun and actually is a desired affect on a motorcycle. You don't have to hang off and lean like I do, but I love the feeling.
A government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul.
George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
Bikes:
2015 FJ-09, Seat Concepts seat cover and foam, Cal Sci medium screen, rim stripes, factory heated grips, Cortech Dryver tank bag ring, Modified stock exhaust, FlashTune with Graves fuel map, Cree driving lights, Aux power socket.
2012 Street Triple type R (Wifes)
2007 FJR1300 (Sold!)
 
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+1 to what all have said. Educated and safe riders are what we need more of. Ultimately it's your money so if an H2R is your fancy then no one can say no.
 
I've been riding for 10+ years, have owned over 20 bikes. I currently street ride and race and I still take the Motorcycle Safety course every 2-3 years. It is very easy to develop bad habits and the hardest part of riding isn't your own skill level but knowing your surroundings and other drivers aren't seeing you.
 
Take the course and ride a beater for a year is my suggestion. The FJ isn't going anywhere and while $9500 is a good deal, a year from now a $7000 FJ with low low miles will be a better deal especially if it has some good mods. Besides, nothing sucks more than dropping that new bike.
 
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+1 to what all have said. Educated and safe riders are what we need more of. Ultimately it's your money so if an H2R is your fancy then no one can say no. 
I've been riding for 10+ years, have owned over 20 bikes. I currently street ride and race and I still take the Motorcycle Safety course every 2-3 years. It is very easy to develop bad habits and the hardest part of riding isn't your own skill level but knowing your surroundings and other drivers aren't seeing you.
 
Take the course and ride a beater for a year is my suggestion. The FJ isn't going anywhere and while $9500 is a good deal, a year from now a $7000 FJ with low low miles will be a better deal especially if it has some good mods. Besides, nothing sucks more than dropping that new bike.

+ 1 I was a former MSF instructor/rider coach  my advice to all students was that their 1st bike should be something similar to the 250cc standard's we used in class. For new riders it's not a matter of "if I drop my bike" but rather "when I drop my bike", so a beater is best. Ride that beater until you hone you street skills and build confidence as a 2 wheel rider then you'll be better prepared to decide which bike is best for you.  It's the right thing to do! ;)
Paul
 
 
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Guest eatpasta
Thanks Cruizin, I live in Chula Vista a suburb of San Diego. I am getting this bike for fun because I want one. I have ridden bikes before, years ago so that is why I consider myself a beginner. I have no desire for wheelies of power slides. Just ride a on the weekends for fun. I am 6'3 260 and don't want to lean, that's why I like the upright bike. I was going to buy the versys 650 but saw the FJ09 on sale for $9500 near me. The 650 versys was $8700. Does that change your opinion at all?
A buddy of mine (Brian) runs a Supermoto school out near you (kinda) but its the best deal running anywhere as far as a bike class - $240 and it includes a bike (Supermoto or road race style, you pick the class but same bikes)
 
 
Ive taken the class at least 4 times and each time, I learn a bit more.  LOVE Brian's school - SO much fun and you become a better rider every time you go.
 
Me on #27 (supermoto school with dirt/jumps)
 
Adams-350.jpg
  
 
 I cut their sizzle reel - check it out
 
[video src=http://youtu.be/RtcCa9oEYaw]
 
I would also recommend a dual sport like a DRZ or a 650L if anything else because they are VERY forgiving bikes and just FUN.  After you get comfy on something like that a drop it a few times, start gravitating toward something like an FJ09....streetbikes are not very forgiving and you get into trouble REAL fast....
 
 
hope some of this helps....
 
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  • 2 weeks later...
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B to A mode? What happened to standard mode?
Standard mode is the default mode every time you turn the ignition on and will be used when you forget to switch to A mode or B mode. 
Standard mode will be used for general riding, weaving through traffic, going to the store.
B mode will be used for beginners, those riding in the rain, stop and go traffic.
A mode will be used when hitting the twisties, especially high speed sweepers and anytime power and acceleration is desired over smoothness.
 
 
A government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend on the support of Paul.
George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
Bikes:
2015 FJ-09, Seat Concepts seat cover and foam, Cal Sci medium screen, rim stripes, factory heated grips, Cortech Dryver tank bag ring, Modified stock exhaust, FlashTune with Graves fuel map, Cree driving lights, Aux power socket.
2012 Street Triple type R (Wifes)
2007 FJR1300 (Sold!)
 
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Like others have said, start with a light weight used bike. It might only be for a short while, but it allows you to get comfortable without being concerned about something happening to a new bike. When you started riding "way back when", what did you start on? Was it a new, high powered machine?
 
No matter what you do, definitely do an MSF course. They're short, inexpensive and give you all the basics. Like SailorJack, I also take the MSF BRC every few years. It's a weekend well spent.
 
Enjoy being back on two wheels. There's nothing else like it.
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  • 3 weeks later...
Some good replies so far. I am relatively new to riding, with about a year and a half under my belt. I took an MSF-like course and highly highly recommend it to anyone looking to start out or picking up a bike again after a long absence. I took it 2 summers ago and will likely register for their refresher course this summer. I know that I've picked up bad habits and want them corrected before they get too ingrained.
 
I test-rode a bunch of different bikes (everything from an 899 panigale to a thruxton) but settled on an 07 SV650s for my first. Put a lot of km's on it last summer and found that I want something where I am not as hunched over, something more comfortable for the longer rides. I don't enjoy driving in traffic here in the city (Calgary) so Im looking more into the touring world. I prefer the nice full-day trips out into the rocky mountains (about an hour away).
 
I went and sat on the FJ-09 this past weekend in a showroom and really liked the way it felt. Much bigger than I thought it would be (Im a big guy). I'm not going to jump into anything and will be waiting until I do a demo-ride (once the roads clear) before purchasing it.
 
Like others have said, don't buy a new bike for your first bike. You're gonna drop it. I dropped my SV twice last year. Once at 3kph doing a u-turn and the other time, I wasn't even on it and was backing it out of my garage. Wasn't thinking and just lost it. Both times resulted in scuffs on the fairings, and the first got me a broken shifter and clutch lever. I was pissed at myself and it wasn't a new bike.
 
With a bike like this, 800cc triple... its too fast for a beginner IMO. Probably too fast for me still... The SV has more than enough to scare the bejesus out of me.
 
 
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  • 2 weeks later...
Thanks Cruizin, I live in Chula Vista a suburb of San Diego. I am getting this bike for fun because I want one. I have ridden bikes before, years ago so that is why I consider myself a beginner. I have no desire for wheelies of power slides. Just ride a on the weekends for fun. I am 6'3 260 and don't want to lean, that's why I like the upright bike. I was going to buy the versys 650 but saw the FJ09 on sale for $9500 near me. The 650 versys was $8700. Does that change your opinion at all?
Others here have already offered excellent advice. I add but one thing and that is in reference to your comment about not wanting to lean. If that is the case get a Spyder...seriously. 
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Go buy this bike. Then, immediately in the parking lot before you even start, kick it over on its side.
 
Does that make sense? Because realistically, that's what's going to happen.
 
No $10,000 bike is a good first bike unless you're rich enough to find $10,000 in your couch.
 
B throttle or not, 115hp is too much for a first bike.
 
I LOVE THIS BIKE. But for the love of god, do not get this as a first bike!
 
Your first bike is not your forever bike.
Your first bike is not your forever bike.
Your first bike is not your forever bike.
 
Get something cheap and low-power. Ride it for 6 months until you're not making noobie mistakes anymore. Sell it for about what you paid for it, then by the bike you really want.
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In the UK a number of riders take a Direct Access course and can then ride a large capacity bike. Many become competent riders but the better riders are often those who garner some experience on lower power machines, especially if those machines are ridden off road where there is a very steep learning curve on bike control.
 
I have done little off road riding but I started out on a Honda Dominator 650cc single cylinder bike with about 43bhp. The equivalent in a more modern machine would be an Aprilia Pegaso or Versys.
 
Some riders in the UK have restricted licences until they are 21 years. Tey fit a restrictor kit to a large capacity bike. In my view, you are better having a bike that is designed to be lower power to begin with than restrict something larger.
 
In summary, I advocate riding for a year or two with half the power of a the FJ09 Tracer.
This signature is left blank as the poster writes enough pretentious bollocks as it is.
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