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jumpjet

Yosemite National Park

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I road up to and through Yosemite National Park from Los Angeles which turned out to be around 700 miles round trip.  That is probably one of my longest one day rides I've done.  I wanted to see how far I am able to comfortably ride in a day to prepare myself for a cross country trip in a couple months. I can say that after that ride, I wasn't in pain and probably could have done a few more miles.  I'm thinking 750 is probably good enough for a days ride.
 
I've been on the fence about trading in my FJ-09 for an FJR which i'm sure is better suited for these distances.  But it's not like I do these types of trips all the time and the FJ-09 seems to handle local and long distances beautifully. 
 
 
20180616_100000.jpg

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I was also on the fence about an FJR and an FJ. The FJR seemed a bit cramped for me, and now after 3,600 miles in 6 days (the longest day being 865 miles) on the FJ I'm happy I chose the FJ-09. It did very well on those distances, and like you I do a lot more local riding.

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Jumpjet, can I ask if that's an MRA Vario screen or the original screen with a MRA lip added?
 
Thanks
 
Steve

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Jumpjet, can I ask if that's an MRA Vario screen or the original screen with a MRA lip added? 
Thanks
 
Steve
I use the Puig Clip-On Windscreen Visor

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Thanks, I didn't know Puig did a clip on, I thought MRA were the only ones......off to take a look now.
 
Cheers
Steve

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I know about being "on the fence" when selecting a new bike, although, in my case, I initially couldn't even find the the fence". The previous bike was a sport bike...albeit a sport bike with an incredibly good V-Twin engine (2006 Suzuki SV650S)...and, in trying to come up with possibilities (ie. I didn't have a "short list"...heck, I didn't even have a list), I had not the slightest clue, other than I wanted something that was MUCH better for 2-up riding, and something that was great for long-distance riding.
 
While some dealers carry only 1-3 makes, I was lucky to have a dealer close by that carries all four Japanese, plus a couple European. Since I've been taking my SV to them for a couple years, I was pretty certain I could trust their advice. Carlos first showed me a few different bikes (including an FJR), telling me the "pluses & minuses" of each, and lastly showed me the FJ. He said, "while those others will also do you well, this is the one you'll want." To make a long story short, he was right. I missed my SV for the first month, but now, 3-1/2 months later, I KNOW I made the right decision.

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I came from an FJR and can attest that pound for pound it is a great bike. The biggest downside is it's cramped and heavy in comparison to the FJ and as I don't do "that" much touring a recently purchased tracer just fits the bill better overall for my needs. Ultimately if you foresee yourself eating up tons of highway miles more often than a few times a year, I'd think the FJR is the bike to have for that type of touring but if not the FJ/Tracer is the way to go. At least that's how I came about to trade in my FJR on the Tracer. I put a lot of miles on a bike every year but my end destinations aren't usually more than 500 miles from home from which I travel.
 
I just don't do that much highway slabbing to warrant missing out on the exhilarating twisty turn nimbleness and fun that the Tracer provides.

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I came from an FJR and can attest that pound for pound it is a great bike. The biggest downside is it's cramped and heavy in comparison to the FJ and as I don't do "that" much touring a recently purchased tracer just fits the bill better overall for my needs. Ultimately if you foresee yourself eating up tons of highway miles more often than a few times a year, I'd think the FJR is the bike to have for that type of touring but if not the FJ/Tracer is the way to go. At least that's how I came about to trade in my FJR on the Tracer. I put a lot of miles on a bike every year but my end destinations aren't usually more than 500 miles from home from which I travel.  
I just don't do that much highway slabbing to warrant missing out on the exhilarating twisty turn nimbleness and fun that the Tracer provides.
Thank you for that.  Since you have first hand experience in riding both bikes, that helps me lean towards keeping the FJ.  Since I don't take that many long distance trips, I may just pass on the FJR.  It's been doing great so far with both local and long distance.

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I came from an FJR and can attest that pound for pound it is a great bike. The biggest downside is it's cramped and heavy in comparison to the FJ.....
 
I completely understand where you went with this. That being said, the FJR & FJ-09/Tr acer are in two different classes of touring bikes. The FJR is a "sport touring" bike, while the FJ-09/Tr acer is a "light sport touring" bike. Among the Japanese "sport touring" bikes (ex. FJR, Honda ST, Kawasaki Concours), the FJR is the lightest/quickest of the bunch. Years ago, when I first considered switching from a sport bike, to a touring bike, the best (Japanese) choices are the Honda & Kawasaki, to which, if I had the money back then, I would have gotten the Honda. However, with the FJR added to the mix, between those three bikes, the FJR would be the winner by a long-shot...this coming from someone who, 10 years ago, would have never considered any Yamaha.

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Thanks Panther,
 
I actually had an 09 Concours and for me there were certain things that I like over that bike compared to the FJR. I believe turn in was much better on the Concours than the FJR as I felt way more planted in the corners. I think if Kawi had amped up their sport touring game and put a cruise control onto the Connie I would be riding one right now. For me the FJR was a great bike but not without faults. It's the lightest of the sport touring bikes but still a heavy bike by far which kills a good bit of the fun factor for me. I did recall having a lot more fun on the Concours in the corners than what I had on the FJR but maybe that's just me getting older. :) I'm hoping the tracer brings me back a few years. Don't want to get too old too quick :)
 

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I know this is an old post, but I thought I would comment.

My two previous bikes were both FJR's. I have a couple of hundred thousand absolutely trouble free miles on the the two of them. they are completely reliable, run on regular fuel, do not have any chain maintenance to worry about being shafts, have a giant gas tank, and are very fast. With a little bit of effort they handle most roads very well. But, in '15, I had reached the age of 72 and while not wanting to give up doing a lot of milage, the weight of the FJRs had begun to be an issue. I had two of them, I rode them everywhere and wanted to keep on doing so. But when it came time to get a new one, I was tempted to go for something much lighter that would work for me. it turns out that the FJ-09 does. It has better ergos for my aging knees and back, handles really well, and goes as fast as I want. I am not a fan of chain maintenance, but it isn't that bad. I was not at all happy with the seat or the suspension, but those things were easily addressed and a fun part of setting up a new bike. Including lots of other mods was still less expensive then a new FJR.

I continue to commute from Portland, OR to San Jose, CA at least once a month, and visit our National Parks regularly (One of the only perks of being geriatric is the almost free life time pass to the Parks!). The bike is not as well sorted out as the much more expensive FJR, but I have come to love the things that it is: light, agile, fast, comfortable enough for many extended riding days, able to carry all my luggage, and being an all around fun ride. No bike is perfect, and no bike is the best for all of us. But for me, at my age, and for my needs, this one does the job very well. 

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On 1/6/2019 at 6:26 AM, huck said:

....but I have come to love the things that it is: light, agile, fast, comfortable enough for many extended riding days, able to carry all my luggage, and being an all around fun ride. No bike is perfect, and no bike is the best for all of us. But for me, at my age, and for my needs, this one does the job very well. 

  •  
 
Well said, from one very old fart to another: my sentiments exactly!

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