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Simon

Some questions about Tracer GT

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I just have some questions about the Tracer 900 GT as this is a bike I am interested in.

Right now, I do not ride enough to justify the cost of getting one. I found a 2019 model for $11,500 CAD but I just (end of last season) picked up my 2008 FZ6 for a fraction of that price. 

I am considering the Tracer because I would like a more touring minded bike. A BIG part of that is the taller windshield. My current FZ6 is naked and the small windshield does not do anything in terms of wind protection on the highway. 

I recently test rode a friends 2019 Tracer GT. Not a long ride but maybe 20-30 min. 

A few things I noticed. (Excuse the lack of proper terminology)

1.Throttle 
The throttle had a lot of free play in it. Maybe not A LOT but more than I am used to. Not sure if I liked this. On my current bike, as soon as you start twisting, the throttle kicks in. On the Tracer I noticed there was a little bit of free play before it actually caught on. 

Is this something normal or something that can be adjusted. 

2. Twitchy/Jerky
So maybe this has something to do with the first observation but I also noticed that the bike seemed very twitchy. As soon as the throttle caught on (after the free play) it really jerked the bike. Not to the point where I was falling off but again not what I expected or am used to. 

Is this the nature of the bike or again something that can be smoothed out?

From what I remember, the Mode was set to Mode-A. I did not try any of the other modes. But my friend said that one of the other options is even more jerky. 

3. Seat Height/Lowering

I am only 5'6 with a 30'ish leg inseam. I do like the seating and and leg position when sitting on the bike. I can still flat foot it while sitting on it. 

But I find that getting into it especially with the side cases on, it is a little hard without scuffing the bike or bags. 

I know that a lowering kit can be installed to lower the bike. If the bike is lowered, does this change the distance from seat to the ground (leaving the distance to foot pegs unchanged) or does it also change the distance from seat to foot pegs. This would mean that my legs would probably be in a bent position a little more. 

 

Hopefully these observations and explanation are clear and easy to answer. These are not the deciding factors of getting the bike or not, just something to thing about. Winning the lottery is the deciding factor. 😜

 

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Hi Simon, welcome to the forum I run a 17 plate ordinary Tracer but here I my observations

1. I havn't had any issues or noticable free play in my setup but the cable is easily adjusted to take up excess play. Just make sure the throttle dosn't come on at full lock

2.I have felt with mine that the fueling can snatch at low speed from off to patially on a bit less in STD mode You do get used to it but flashing the ECU or addjusting the throttle position sensor can eliminate this. After the first few weeks of ownership I didn't feel the need to do this.

3.A you mentioned Lowering links are available and easily fitted that can drop the seat hight by 25mm or so this will have the same leg room but will decrease the ground clearance and you will need more effort to lift the bike on to the centre stand. When I run mine with the aftermarket shad side cases I just put up with the fact that I am going to hit them sometimes with my foot.

It is a fantastic bike and if you can make it suit your requirements you should go for it.

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Slightly simple answer for the 'getting on bike question", but why dont you just mount the bike like a horse....just put you left foot on the left peg and step up onto the bike, swinging your leg over the seat.  This should allow you to avoid scuffing the panniers.  Hold the front brake  whilst you mount and dismount.  Keep the balance of your weight to the left of the bike so that it is still weighted towards the side stand and does not topple the other way.  If you have hip injuries or inflexibility, this is often the only way to get on. 

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A mode is the most aggressive of the throttle responses, so it can seem jerky. STD mode is much smoother and B mode is for the rain or other dodgy road surfaces, where you may need a much softer “ramp” or generally duller throttle response.


Red 2015 Tracer, UK spec (well, it was until I started messing with it...

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Is  $11500 for the GT model or the standard version? If you are thinking of getting one you should consider the GT with cruise control, quick shifter and TFT dash.

Your FZ6 (not the FZ6R) is a great bike. I had one for a few years and put many enjoyable miles on it. I don't notice any significant free play in the throttle on my Tracer and as soon as you twist it it gets up and goes. The difference between the Tracer and your FZ6 is on the Tracer there is power  everywhere where as on the FZ6 it really starts to kick in after 6000 RPM.  I'm surprised you found the Tracer more jerky, the FZ6 is not the smoothest bike on the market. A simple fix on the Tracer is to put it in B mode, I ride in Standard mode most of the time and love it. I'm 6' 1' and also find it a challenge to get a leg over the bike with bags on and ride without them most of the time. At 5' 6"  I would think it would be even more challenging and probably similar for you on most bikes with bags attached. 

If your riding is not enough to justify getting one I would recommend getting the most out of your FZ6 for now and when ready check out all the bikes that are available in the style you like.

 

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Posted (edited)

There is a cable adjuster to take out any slack. Start there.

Ive found that most of the jerkiness comes from me. Ive notice that if I dont close and open the throttle quickly its smooth.

Its made be alot smoother on throttle use.

I thought cruise control was kinda silly..........at first. Ive come to really enjoy having it. Its real nice to just the speed and and just cruise and not always having to be giving throttle input with the right arm.

 

Edited by duckie

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6 hours ago, HGP61 said:

Hi Simon, welcome to the forum I run a 17 plate ordinary Tracer but here I my observations

1. I havn't had any issues or noticable free play in my setup but the cable is easily adjusted to take up excess play. Just make sure the throttle dosn't come on at full lock

2.I have felt with mine that the fueling can snatch at low speed from off to patially on a bit less in STD mode You do get used to it but flashing the ECU or addjusting the throttle position sensor can eliminate this. After the first few weeks of ownership I didn't feel the need to do this.

3.A you mentioned Lowering links are available and easily fitted that can drop the seat hight by 25mm or so this will have the same leg room but will decrease the ground clearance and you will need more effort to lift the bike on to the centre stand. When I run mine with the aftermarket shad side cases I just put up with the fact that I am going to hit them sometimes with my foot.

It is a fantastic bike and if you can make it suit your requirements you should go for it.

I have not thought about the Centre Strand issue.  This might be something to think about as I am not a big body guy so it might make it a little more difficult. TY

4 hours ago, BozBoz said:

Slightly simple answer for the 'getting on bike question", but why dont you just mount the bike like a horse....just put you left foot on the left peg and step up onto the bike, swinging your leg over the seat.  This should allow you to avoid scuffing the panniers.  Hold the front brake  whilst you mount and dismount.  Keep the balance of your weight to the left of the bike so that it is still weighted towards the side stand and does not topple the other way.  If you have hip injuries or inflexibility, this is often the only way to get on. 

I have tried this a few times on my current bike actually. 
I guess its just a habit trying to mount the bike as you would on a regular bicycle. 
I think it would be just a matter of getting used to the horse method and eventually it would become second nature. Good suggestion. 

 

55 minutes ago, Torbeach said:

Is  $11500 for the GT model or the standard version? If you are thinking of getting one you should consider the GT with cruise control, quick shifter and TFT dash.

Your FZ6 (not the FZ6R) is a great bike. I had one for a few years and put many enjoyable miles on it. I don't notice any significant free play in the throttle on my Tracer and as soon as you twist it it gets up and goes. The difference between the Tracer and your FZ6 is on the Tracer there is power  everywhere where as on the FZ6 it really starts to kick in after 6000 RPM.  I'm surprised you found the Tracer more jerky, the FZ6 is not the smoothest bike on the market. A simple fix on the Tracer is to put it in B mode, I ride in Standard mode most of the time and love it. I'm 6' 1' and also find it a challenge to get a leg over the bike with bags on and ride without them most of the time. At 5' 6"  I would think it would be even more challenging and probably similar for you on most bikes with bags attached. 

If your riding is not enough to justify getting one I would recommend getting the most out of your FZ6 for now and when ready check out all the bikes that are available in the style you like.

 

$11500 for a 2019 GT model with 8,500kms. Seems to be average going rate for them around here. Not that there are many on the used market. 
Yes I, would only be considering the GT model. Cruise Control being the most important feature of the difference between the GT and standard. It's not something that can be added on later. (not easily)

Yes, mine is the FZ6 without the R.

I did notice that the Tracer does have the power everywhere, and lots of it. Much easier to pass a truck on the highway. Almost no need to shift down. 

I do also have Givi E22 side cases for my bike and also found it a bit of a challenge getting on and off. Again, just a matter of getting used to it. Maybe a little more body exercise and work on my splits. lol

Realistically speaking, I will probably keep my FZ6 for now and a few more years. I got it a good deal, part of me wants to keep it for that reason alone. If I tried to sell it today, I could probably profit $1000-$2000. 
The reason why I wanted to explore the idea of the Tracer is because I wanted a bike with a little more features. ABS, Cruise Control and a touring friendly windshield.

However, it will be easier and cheaper to adapt an even $300 touring windshield onto my bike than buying a new bike. The others I could live without. But I will keep my eyes opened especially towards the end of the season or winter. I might bite if I find one for a really good deal. 
 

Not closing the thread, but thanks to all that have contributed so far. 

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16 minutes ago, Simon said:

Yes I, would only be considering the GT model. Cruise Control being the most important feature of the difference between the GT and standard. It's not something that can be added on later. (not easily)

Don't dismiss the base level Tracer or even older FJ due to no factory cruise control.  The MCCruise can be added relatively easily, its time consuming, about 4-5 hours, but not difficult.

Right now, the base Tracer can be found in Cycle Trader for $7500 - BRAND NEW.  Buy it for cheap and build it up as you see fit and save thousands$$.

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***2015 Candy Red FJ-09***

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Posted (edited)
On 6/24/2020 at 6:40 PM, BozBoz said:

Slightly simple answer for the 'getting on bike question", but why dont you just mount the bike like a horse....just put you left foot on the left peg and step up onto the bike, swinging your leg over the seat.  This should allow you to avoid scuffing the panniers.  Hold the front brake  whilst you mount and dismount.  Keep the balance of your weight to the left of the bike so that it is still weighted towards the side stand and does not topple the other way.  If you have hip injuries or inflexibility, this is often the only way to get on. 

This sounds great.  Have you had problem with the side stand ? Like bent it. I'm a porky and haven't been game to try this.

Keen to hear your comments. 

 

Edited by Chops
Grammar!

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Hi Chops,

Sorry for the delay in replying to this. I have not had any problem with the centre stand bending or buckling.  From memory, the maximum payload for the 900GT is (I think as I don't have the handbook in front of me) 190kgs. I guess the simplest way to check this is to call your dealer.  I would assume, perhaps incorrectly, that with a permitted payload of 190kgs, the side stand is capable of taking this weight.  Of course, the payload isn't normally distributed in this way but I think that would be the manufacturers start point.  Hence my suggestion to check with the dealer.  Option two would be to put the bike on the centre stand.  Once mounted you can 'jerk the bike forward off the stand'. Takes a bit of practice but doable.

The other point to bear in mind is that the side stand does not have a very big foot on it. So, there is risk the extra weight, as you mount, may sink the stand into softer surfaces. Again, you can just obtain a wider foot for the site stand to help spread the load.

Lastly, and it is a bit of diversion, but there have been problems with the pin bolt on some centre stands not being sufficiently strong.  Triumph had a recall on their 1200 Tiger Explorers (I had one at the time)  to replace the bolt as it occasionally snapped causing the side stand to collapse.  Not ideal if you were in the process of mounting the bike.

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Many thanks Boz Boz for your info, appreciated. 

Will have a crack at it.

Cheers 

 

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I'm a 135kg guy.  My kickstand holds me and the bike just fine, without any flex or "eeeeeeeh" uncertain feeling whatsoever.  


It's a sturdy sidestand.

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On 7/4/2020 at 2:29 PM, Wintersdark said:

I'm a 135kg guy.  My kickstand holds me and the bike just fine, without any flex or "eeeeeeeh" uncertain feeling whatsoever.  


It's a sturdy sidestand.

Thanks for that . I feel positively anorexic after reading that!

Will grow some and have a crack at it.

F

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