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I'm nearing 600 miles on the new Tracer. Does anyone actually take their bike in for the 600 mile service? I ordered Yamalube synthetic oil and a Yamaha filter and plan to do the oil change myself. Is the rest of the service necessary in your opinion?

The things I'm most concerned with are the injector sync and the steering head bearing check since I'm not really mechanically inclined. Or should I bring the oil/filter to my mechanic and let him do the entire service using my provided parts? I kind of feel this service may be the most important one to do thoroughly and with a certified mechanic.

Edited by Chowda
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2 hours ago, Chowda said:

kind of feel this service may be the most important one to do thoroughly and with a certified mechanic.

...you will not get value for money here. Most mechanics will fly through the check list loosely on what is basically a brand new bike.

Having said that... take it in if it will put your mind at ease. Ask them to produce a signed check list... for whatever it's worth.

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IMO, changing the oil and filter, checking the chain adjustment, and spending about 30 minutes checking to see if the various fasteners are snug is all that is required with the break in service. 

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I would not take it to the dealer.  I always buy the factory service manual for each bike I own and do all the work myself.  Saves a lot of money.

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There is nothing like spending a day riding with friends in the grip of a shared obsession.

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I only took my Tracer 9GT+ to the dealer for it's 600 mile service because I had some tires I wanted on the bike. I used the coupon from Yamaha. 

I'm going to do the first service on the Triumph myself because the dealer is too far away and the service department seemed kinda flaky. It's always nice to find a good mechanic, I had one in CA that I trusted for valves and such, but not yet here MO. 

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On 6/24/2024 at 9:37 AM, Chowda said:

I'm nearing 600 miles on the new Tracer. Does anyone actually take their bike in for the 600 mile service?

I think it's a pretty important service so long as you have access to a good mechanic. The thing is, the Tracer is fresh off the assembly line, presumably with some final assembly at the dealer/distributor. If anything was not done quite right at either of these assemblies, a good mechanic has a chance of catching it.

Maybe a cable is rubbing or the brake fluid is suspiciously high/low or maybe the suspension seems to have an unexpected sag.  Maybe on the post-service test-ride they notice the quick-shifter acts a bit different from the others they have ridden? Maybe they noticed the steering-head bearing is a little tighter than normal? Or may the ergonomic settings are a bit oddball?

An important consideration is that the Tracer is new to you and you don't really know what normal is yet. Particular during the run-in stage where the gearbox, brakes and other bits and pieces are bedding in. Something that feels funny to you, such as the floating front brakes (which I thought odd when I first rode my Tracer), is normal to a knowing mechanic. Something that may feel normal to you, such as the ergonomics or the way it falls into a corner may seem odd to a knowing mechanic.

Point being, if something isn't quite right with the Tracer, your first service with a good mechanic has the best chance of catching it early.

99.9% of the time there will be nothing to catch of course, but the first service usually isn't that expensive and a good mechanic will know that a first-service is as much about casting an experienced eye over the machine and feeling how it rides, as it is about changing the consumables.

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On 6/24/2024 at 9:17 PM, johnmark101 said:

I would not take it to the dealer.  I always buy the factory service manual for each bike I own and do all the work myself.  Saves a lot of money.

That may work for you, but the OP made it pretty clear that:

On 6/24/2024 at 9:37 AM, Chowda said:

I'm not really mechanically inclined

 

Frankly, I'd be very surprise if anyone comes onto this forum asking questions about servicing and maintenance if they have the skills, time, tools and space to perform their own work.

Edited by ZigMerid
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I’ve found pretty much every manufacturer and dealer will help honor your warranty even if it’s slightly out of date and fight for things to get covered far more if it’s a dealer serviced bike and they’ve done the 600 mile and “annual” services if your bike calls for one than if you do it yourself. 
 

That might mean nothing to you but while I’m fully capable of servicing my bikes, and I do still service most of them, my newest ones get dealer serviced and it’s literally paid off in things that have been covered well out of warranty. Granted it was a Ducati and now Triumph but if a manufacture can find a way out of warranting something, they will. 
 

And @ZigMeridwhile I think what you said is not exactly wrong and would be awesome if it was true, you’re fooling yourself if you think the dealer does anything but the absolute bare minimum oil and filter change, check the chain tension and send you on you’re way, you’re mistaken. They do not go over every bolt, check alignment, verify setup (new setup is generally bolting on a windscreen and maybe bolting on the bars or other small things, it comes fully fluid filled from the factory sans fuel so they do very little), look at or re-torque anything. First service is generally the lowest tech in the food chain, only above the new bike setup person and the quicker you are out, the better. 
 

What’s important is they are SUPPOSED to check that stuff so if it fails, it’s on them that first year. 

The one thing they do, however, that’s SUPER important nowadays on these complicated, computer controlled bikes, is plug it into the computer and check those systems and be sure software is 100% up to date with the latest versions. That is the second most important thing they do. And on my ‘24 Triumph Street Triple RS I just bought they loaded a much different fuel map and the bike flat out runs and rides 100% better than it did before the service. 
 

I would have the dealer do it, especially on a newer bike. 

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I recently spoke with a local service manager at the Yamaha dealer I bought my bike from regarding getting the valves checked soon, and he stated "they won't need adjusted, the MT09's we do are always in spec". Well.....I told him he was full of shit, most here on the forum find the exhausts to be tight upon inspection when doing it themselves the first inspection or when having a "reputable" dealer do the check/adjust. He didn't like my response much to say the least LOL, and I will not be having them check my valves. So there is one of my many dealings with "dealer techs", let's just say that I am not very trusting and will be going with a reputable independent mechanic who builds up motorcycle race engines and has his own dyno and tuning software. Oil and filter change, bolt check and chain adjustment, should be something that every rider/owner knows how to do.........my 2 cents whether popular or not.

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On 6/25/2024 at 10:37 PM, ZigMerid said:

Frankly, I'd be very surprise if anyone comes onto this forum asking questions about servicing and maintenance if they have the skills, time, tools and space to perform their own work.

Fair point.  For some it may be best to seek help.

However, I was not mechanically inclined when I bought my first motorcycle decades ago.  But I eventually learned by taking my time and doing small tasks first.  I bought special tools along the way as needed.  I think a lot of people start out this way and go on the do all the work themselves.

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There is nothing like spending a day riding with friends in the grip of a shared obsession.

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Posted (edited)

Scheduled the 600 mile service for 7/13. I appreciate all the advice. I feel having a dealer do the 1st service and give me a printout is right for me. I paid $500 for a 60 month extended warranty and want it to remain intact without any disputes if I ever need to use it.

I'll do the rest until the 26k mile valve clearance check is done. 

Edited by Chowda
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I'm wrestling with GMC on a friggin' replacement transmission warranty, and it's all about friggin' documentation.  With this GT+, to me, it's got a lot of "novel electronics" - meaning this stuff is new.  My concern is that with everything from this great new LED readout to the unified braking, to the sorta-dynamic suspension, to the friggin' bat radar...  I took the extended warranty (which I never do) just because there's so much new kit in this build.  To me, that means that the bike is going to need good service dox.  I want the dealer's fingerprint on the first record.  Down the road, yeah, I can do oil/filters and cable tensions.  But I'll pay the dealer for some service visits to keep him on my side of any potential "biggies."

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Everyone should do what they are most comfortable with, but FWIW, I have 61,000 miles on my ‘16 FJR, 49,000 miles on my ‘18 Super Tenere, and 31,000 miles on a ‘22 Tracer 9 GT; all bought new by me, and never had a warranty claim/service needed on them or the several other Yamaha motorcycles I’ve owned in the past. On two occasions, I bought extended warranties, and never used them. The old adage, ride more, worry less, is appropriate with Yamahas. 

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8 minutes ago, kingfisher said:

Everyone should do what they are most comfortable with, but FWIW, I have 61,000 miles on my ‘16 FJR, 49,000 miles on my ‘18 Super Tenere, and 31,000 miles on a ‘22 Tracer 9 GT; all bought new by me, and never had a warranty claim/service needed on them or the several other Yamaha motorcycles I’ve owned in the past. On two occasions, I bought extended warranties, and never used them. The old adage, ride more, worry less, is appropriate with Yamahas. 

I'm more worried about the electronic gizmos than anything else. I paid $500 for a 5 year extended warranty so didn't feel too put off by it.

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