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Valve check


jeravoy
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  • 3 weeks later...
I will let you know soon, I'll be checking mine at 24k km's. I cant wait until 40k like Yamaha suggests. I see bikes at work all the time that need adjusting before the recommended intervals.And op get yourself a manual mate, it has crucial info like timing marks and cam removal marks and torque setting that might get missed if somebody writs up a how to for you.
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Guest reeseyboy
How I can add pdf?
If you mean, "how can I add a PDF copy of the Yamaha manual?", you can't. No posting of copywrite material on this site/board/forum is allowed. 
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Yep. Feeler gauges are a must, and a set called "go, no-go" can speed up the process.
 
If you do have to pull the camshafts to adjust the clearances, you will need a micrometer to measure the shim sizes accurately. You will then need to know how to follow the chart in the service manual to install the correct shim to bring the clearances back into check. Or know a formula or have enough common sense to figure it out.
 
Then the cams have to be reinstalled and timed correctly.
 
I CANNOT stress this enough.... this CP3 engine is tricky to get back in time correctly. DO NOT attempt to remove and reinstall based on some internet write up if you have never done this before! Service manual is a MUST!
 
(And yes, I have had cams out of these bikes...)
 
 
-Skip
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Last bike I had to adjust the shims, I used a microscope to look at the mating surfaces of the shims. Some of the used shims had matting surfaces that where pretty bad. They measured OK, but lots of pitting and metal loss on the surface.
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Last bike I had to adjust the shims, I used a microscope to look at the mating surfaces of the shims. Some of the used shims had matting surfaces that where pretty bad. They measured OK, but lots of pitting and metal loss on the surface.
Did you figure out why that was? Low oil pressure...?
 
Were they the 7.5 or 9.5 mm shims? Or a larger, older style?
 
I've exchanged some that have a slight indentation from the top of the valve stem. I'd guess that's fairly normal? Or maybe all shims aren't created equally? For example, maybe the Hotcams shims are a lesser quality than oem...
 
Hmmm...
 
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The shims I looked at under a microscope were for a Ducati, several years ago. I ended up getting over sized shims and sanding them down to the spec I needed on flat tile and fine wet or dry sand paper. Lots of work, but ended up with perfect specs. Too bad I totaled the bike before I got enough miles on it to see how well they lasted. Too many variables in engine operation to begin to guess exactly what caused the metal surface to break down. I do not know if this will work with Yamaha shims.
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The shims I looked at under a microscope were for a Ducati, several years ago. I ended up getting over sized shims and sanding them down to the spec I needed on flat tile and fine wet or dry sand paper. Lots of work, but ended up with perfect specs. Too bad I totaled the bike before I got enough miles on it to see how well they lasted. Too many variables in engine operation to begin to guess exactly what caused the metal surface to break down. I do not know if this will work with Yamaha shims.
 
Personally, I wouldn't chance it.
 
Buy the right Yamaha shim that you need. Or order a Pro-X kit like John referred to in the above post.
 
How many miles on your bike anyway? I just rolled through 20k, so it'll be spring before I get to mine.
 
-S
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Another tip: Many many moons ago, at Kawasaki Racing Engines School, we were taught to set clearance to max spec and exactly the same. Over the last several years this advice has served me well. If you are going to spend the time to check valve clearance, spend the time to set the clearance exactly correct. Do not be satisfied with just being in spec.
john
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Another tip: Many many moons ago, at Kawasaki Racing Engines School, we were taught to set clearance to max spec and exactly the same. Over the last several years this advice has served me well. If you are going to spend the time to check valve clearance, spend the time to set the clearance exactly correct. Do not be satisfied with just being in spec. john
 
That's interesting. What was their reasoning for the maximum side of the spec?
 
Typically, exhaust valve clearances get looser over time, and the intake clearances go tighter.
 
The other issue with setting them exactly is that most shim kits are 0.5mm increments. It's difficult to find them in 0.1mm increments unless the factory installed them when the engine was assembled.
 
Thus it's harder if not sometimes impossible to put the clearance exactly where you want it.
 
-Skip
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